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College of Health Sciences

Downers Grove, IL Campus

Electives

Master of Biomedical Sciences Program

Abbreviation/Number
Course Name

ANAT 0565

Human Neurosciences

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This is an integrated, interdisciplinary course in which students learn to identify and describe the principal structural components and corresponding functions of the human nervous system. Emphasis is given to correlating underlying lesions involving these structures with neurologic deficits and dysfunctions likely to be encountered in clinical practice. Integrated lectures are given by faculty in the Departments of Anatomy and Physiology, and the Physician Assistant Program.

Credits: 4

ANAT 1500

Human Gross Anatomy & Embryology

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This course presents lectures and laboratory (human cadaver prosection, microscopy) sessions emphasizing the embryologic development of the human body, the relationship between body structure and function, and the use of gross human anatomy in physical diagnosis.

Credits: 7

BIOC 0552

Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition

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The objective of this course is to equip the physician assistant with the knowledge needed to apply nutritional principles to preventive medicine and various common pathologies. Additional topics include clinical problem solving skills, statistics in clinical decision making, blood clotting, the role of nutrition in different anemias, diabetes mellitus, the hyperlipidemias, and factors affecting blood chemistries.

Credits: 3

BIOC 1445

Principles and Practices of Enteral and Total Parenteral Nutrition

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This course surveys the biochemical, metabolic, and nutritional sciences underlying the provision of nutritional support, and provides a basic introduction to the clinical practices involved in its implementation. During the course students apply information provided in lectures to the provision of nutrition support in selected clinical case studies.

Credits: 1

Prerequisites

BIOC 1551, 1552 Biochemistry I, II

BIOC 1447

Nutrition in Preventative Medicine

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This module presents the student with current concepts relating diet to the incidence, etiology, pathogenesis, and prevention of three chronic diseases (cardiovascular disease, cancer, and osteoporosis).

Credits: 1

BISC 0580

Pathophysiology

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This course is designed to discuss the etiology, pathogenesis and pathophysiology of selected human disease conditions. A brief review of the normal physiology of each organ system will be discussed prior to presenting prominent disease conditions in each of the following areas: immune regulation; wound healing; hematologic, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, endocrine, gastrointestinal, neural, and musculoskeletal systems. The information presented in this course will build on previous information obtained in Human Physiology I and II.

Credits: 4

BISC 0636, 0637, 0638, 0639, 0640

Advanced Topics/Journal Club

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The Advanced Topic Series is an opportunity for students to receive individualized or small group instruction on selected advanced topics in any of the basic science disciplines. Format for instruction includes mentoring by individual faculty, case study discussion, review of landmark publications, and class presentations. Students are expected to master major concepts specific to the discipline selected. The mentoring faculty individualize evaluation of the student.

Credits: 1-3

BISC 0644

Biomedical Imaging

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This course covers various forms of clinical and research-grade microscopy. The format will consist of a weekly one hour lecture and a two hour lab exercise (hands-on experience with compound, fluorescence, and confocal microscopes, as well as computer programs for image analysis).

Credits: 2

Prerequisite

Biochemisytry I (BIOC 1551) and Fundamentals of Research (BISC 0512) or prior course director approval.

BISC 0645

Biomarkers in Health and Disease

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The purpose of this elective course is to present the concept and importance of biomarkers in health and disease. Generally speaking, a biomarker is anything that can be used as an indicator of a particular disease state or some other physiological state. We will cover the fundamentals of biomarker development, describe research methodologies for identification and detection of biomarkers and review several biomarkers currently used in the clinic along with some promising candidate biomarkers.

Credits: 2

Prerequisites

Biochemistry I (BIOC 1551) or equivalent.

BISC 0850

Intestinal Bacteria in Health and Disease

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This course will discuss the role of intestinal bacteria in maintaining health and in the progression of disease states such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Health benefits of probiotics, prebiotics, and exercise will be addressed with regards to their influence on intestinal bacteria. State-of-the-art techniques currently used to detect and characterize intestinal bacteria will be described. Course includes lectures by leaders in this area of investigation and active class discussion. Emphasis is on application of this information to clinical conditions.

Credits: 2

Prerequisites

PHYS 1510, 1511 Human Physiology I, II; BIOC 1551, 1552 Biochemistry I, II; and MICR 0583 Medical Microbiology

PHAR 1410

Pharmacologic Aspects of Drug Abuse

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This elective provides an in-depth understanding of the pharmacology of the common drugs of abuse including alcohol, cocaine, stimulants, hallucinogens, and opioids. Particular emphasis is given to basic pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms as they relate to the effects of drugs and to the development of drug tolerance and dependence. Current theories regarding the physiologic basis of drug-seeking behavior and the development of drug dependence are presented. In addition, various social, legal, and ethical aspects of the drug abuse problem are considered.

Credits: 2

PHAR 1420

Medical Spanish

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The elective provides medical, pharmacy, physician assistant and biomedical sciences students with the Spanish vocabulary necessary to understand and converse in the fields of medicine and healthcare. The course has been designed to enhance communicating with the Latino patient as well as understanding cultural attitudes, which may impact medical care. Listening, comprehension, and conversational skills will be stressed through dialogues and oral presentations. Critical learning skills that students are encouraged to develop are cooperative learning and effective group dynamics.

Credits: 2

Prerequisites

Two years of high school Spanish or college Spanish

PHAR 1430

Cardiovascular Pharmacology

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Cardiovascular (CV) disease is a national health problem of major consequence. Its treatment is one of the principal problems facing modern medicine. This elective is designed to familiarize the student with the most significant of all CV diseases, atherosclerosis; and potential anti-atherosclerotic effectiveness and mechanisms of various CV drugs and non-drug forms of therapy.

Credits: 2

Prerequisites:

PHAR 0584, 0585 Pharmacology I, II or PHAR 1641, 1642 Pharmacology I, II

PHYS 1637

Exercise Physiology

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This course presents core concepts and terminology in exercise physiology. Emphasis is placed on the immediate and long-term physiologic compensatory adjustments to exercise, the role of exercise in promoting optimal health, and the role of exercise as a diagnostic or therapeutic modality in disease states. This is a lecture-based course that utilizes problem-based written assignments to foster application of material.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

PHYS 1510, 1511 Human Physiology I, II

PPRA 1321

Medication Management in Primary and Secondary Schools

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This course describes medication management in schools including transfer, storage, administration, use, and disposal. It addresses five important related issues: documentation, delegation of medication management responsibility, liability concerns, therapeutic issues, and the availability of information needed to adequately perform medication management. It reviews medication management guidelines and relevant conceptual frameworks, including rational drug therapy and polycentric authority, and provides a summary of the empirical literature. It shows that pharmacy has been involved very little in this problem in the past, and specifies ways that individual pharmacists and pharmacies, can get involved in medication management in schools and improve the situation.

Credits: 2

PSCI 1371

Alternative Therapies and Natural Products

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Alternative therapies are being used by a growing percentage of the population and are becoming more visible to mainstream medical practice. Health care professionals should develop the knowledge and skills necessary to aid the patient in making rational decisions about the use of alternative therapies. This elective focuses on the utility of drugs from natural sources in today's practice environment and surveys the products of animals, plants, microbes, and biotechnology that will impact pharmacy tomorrow.

Credits: 3

PSCI 1376

Development of Newly Approved Drug Therapies

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The FDA is constantly engaged in evaluating new drug treatments and approving them for marketing in the US. Annually, the FDA approves about 20 new drug therapies. The process involved in the development of new drug therapies for certain clinical conditions and diseases will be discussed. The business aspects of developing new drug therapies, and the impact of pharmaceutical innovations on society and the business community will be covered.

Credits: 2