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Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine

Glendale, AZ Campus

Course Descriptions Overview

Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine

Prerequisites for courses may be established by the department that administers the course. Prerequisites are recommended to the Curriculum Committee for approval and are listed within the course description in the catalog.

On a case-by-case basis, prerequisites may be waived upon approval of the department chair of the department that delivers the course.

Abbreviation/Number
Course Name

ANAT 1511

Gross Anatomy I

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In this course, students approach the study of the human body in a regional manner with sequential study of the back and body cavity, including the thorax and abdomino-pelvic regions and associated body wall structures. Included in the dissection of each region are the musculoskeletal, vascular, nervous and lymphatic components, relevant surface anatomy, and imaging of the region. The lectures and laboratories are coordinated with the Histology/Embryology course to provide an overall anatomic view of each region. This course involves lecture and dissection in the laboratory, and student progress is evaluated through written and practical examinations.

Credits: 5

BIOC 1511

Biochemistry I

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Course modules in Biochemistry I feature protein structure and enzymes emphasizing structure-function relationships; cell biology emphasizing how cells move, grow, and divide; molecular biology emphasizing the role of nucleic acids in storage and expression of genetic information; and intermediary metabolism emphasizing degradation and synthesis of carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids; and tissues and organs emphasizing the customization and adaptation of biochemical pathways in specialized cells. Clinical aspects as well as regulation and coordination of biologic processes during the fed and fasted states are emphasized. Workshops introduce the biochemical basis of common clinical laboratory tests and/or illustrate clinical applications of biochemical concepts.

Credits: 7

BIOC 1522

Biochemistry II

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Biochemistry II has modules on human nutrition emphasizing the importance of nutrition in health and preventive medicine; human genetics emphasizing the inheritance of selected genetic disorders; and cell cycle regulation and molecular basis of cancer; and various types of anemia focusing on the biochemical and molecular basis; and hemostasis and its related topics. The workshops introduce the biochemical basis of common clinical laboratory tests and/or they illustrate clinical applications of biochemical concepts. Selected workshops feature a modified problem-based learning environment.

Credits: 4

CARD 1701

Core Cardiology Rotation

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This third year, 4-week rotation is designed to provide the student with a fundamental knowledge of cardiology and to introduce students to basic procedures relevant to the practice of cardiology. Both ambulatory and inpatient settings are utilized to expose the student to various aspects of the management of patients in a cardiology practice. Rotation experiences include reading, lectures, seminars, small group sessions, and patient care management.

Credits: 6

CLMD 1631

Introduction to Radiology

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Presented in the spring quarter of the second year, this course provides clinical lectures to prepare students to recognize and understand the utilization of common imaging procedures.

Credits: 1

CLMD 1632

Cumulative Review

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This course will provide the student a solid preparation for the Level 1 medical licensing board examination. The student will learn how to plan out a reasonable study schedule, know the recommended review texts, and learn the level of medical knowledge needed to excel on the licensing exam. The curricular content will blend both basic science and clinical medicine to allow for integration and critical thinking. Ultimately, the goal is for students to surpass the national average score on the examination, which will assist them in attaining residency placement and further the quality of future physicians. The final examination for this course must be passed prior to students being permitted to take COMLEX-USA Level 1.

Credits: 3

CLMD 1701

Osteopathic Clinical Medicine - Thid Year Didactics

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Osteopathic Clinical Medicine is a year-long course during the OMS III year composed of the following components: 1. Certification in Basic Life Support and Advanced Cardiac Life Support. 2). Objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) which are conducted throughout the year to evaluate the student’s history and physical examination skills and SOAP note writing skills. 3). Large group lecture on administrative and clinical academic topics relevant to OMS III year rotations. 4). Departments of Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, and Surgery/Anesthesia lectures, group discussions, skills laboratories and/or workshops. 5). At the end of the third year, students participate in a series of OSCEs as part of a summative evaluation. Students are graded across three domains: history and physical skills, interpersonal and communication skills and written documentation skills (SOAP notes). The OSCEs are structured to mirror the COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE that each student must take and pass as a graduation requirement. They must pass the end of year final OSCEs to be allowed to progress into the OMS IV year. 6). At the end of the third year, students are required to take and pass a final examination. Students must pass the final examination prior to progressing into the OMS IV year.

Credits: 5.5

CLMD 1801

Osteopathic Clinical Medicine - Fourth Year Didactics - A

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Osteopathic Clinical Medicine, Didactics, Winter Quarter, is composed of lectures and workshops that support the fourth year curriculum. Course is presented over two quarters, currently winter and spring.

Credits: 1.2

CLMD 1802

Osteopathic Clinical Medicine - Fourth Year Didactics - B

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Osteopathic Clinical Medicine, Didactics, Spring Quarter, is composed of lectures and workshops that support the fourth year curriculum. Course is presented over two quarters, currently winter and spring.

Credits: 1.2

CMED 1613

Patient Care Experience I

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This course is offered in second year, fall quarter, and is designed to help students make the transition from a screening history and physical examination of patients without a chief complaint to a problem-focused history and physical examination for the patient with a chief complaint. Emphasis will be on: 1) generating differential diagnoses; 2) obtaining a problem-focused history; 3) performing a problem-focused physical examination; 4) oral presentation skills; 5) obtaining a medical history from various patients; 6) documentation.Students will gain experience in formulating diagnostic and treatment plans through their participation in interactive group individual Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), and standardized patients. The individual OSCE experiences will be designed to give students the opportunity to conduct history and physical examinations on patients of various ages with different presenting complaints.

Credits: 1

CMED 1624

Patient Care Experience II

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This course is a continuation of the CMED 1613 course. It is offered in second year, winter quarter, and is designed with two major teaching goals: 1) Provide experiences in how to perform the female breast/pelvic examination and the male genitourinary/prostate examination. 2) Continue assisting students in developing their skills in performing a problem-focused history and physical examination in an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) on standardized patients with a chief complaint. Emphasis will be on: generating differential diagnoses, obtaining a problem-focused history, performing a problem-focused physical exam, performing a problem-focused history and physical examination professionally and with the proper interpersonal skills, developing an appropriate SOAP note.

Credits: 1

CORE 1560, 1570, 1580

Interdisciplinary Healthcare

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The Interdisciplinary Healthcare course involves the Colleges of Dental Medicine, Health Sciences, Optometry, Osteopathic Medicine, and Pharmacy. The course is designed to teach all clinically-based students about each other's clinical programs and how they interact together as part of an interdisciplinary healthcare team: cardiovascular sciences, clinical psychology, dental medicine, nurse anesthesia, occupational therapy, optometry, osteopathic medicine, pharmacy, physician assistant, physical therapy and podiatry students learn about the importance of an interdisciplinary approach to patient care. The class consists primarily of online presentations that are delivered by interdisciplinary team members from each of the clinical programs. Associated quizzes will also be completed online. Occasional lectures will also be given in the classroom in a seminar format or in conjunction with panel presentations.

Credits: Each 0.5

ELEC 1801

Elective Rotations

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Students have 24 weeks of electives during the fourth year but may designate four of those weeks as additional rotation, study, interview, or vacation time. Elective rotations must be done in four week blocks, although students can petition the respective clinical department chair to be allowed to split an elective into two 2-week blocks. Students may request to do electives in basic science or clinical research. Additionally, one 4-week elective can be used for an international rotation. All electives must be approved by the appropriate Chair in the Department of Clinical Education. Additional policies regarding electives are provided in the Clinical Education Policies Manual.

Credits: 36

EMED 1801

Emergency Medicine Core Rotation

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This fourth-year rotation consists of four weeks of emergency department experiences, and exposes the student to various aspects of managing patients in an emergency department setting. This rotation emphasizes diagnostic skills, ability to prioritize patient care and different views of problems that are usually seen only in the hospital emergency department setting.

Credits: 6

FMED 1531

Clinical Ethics/Medical Jurisprudence

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This course, in first year, spring quarter, covers complimentary topics and aspects of care that will be necessary to formulate a solid foundation for clinical medicine as it relates to clinical ethics, medical jurisprudence, end of life care, and public health. Ethical issues regarding life and death, medical malpractice, professionalism, and laws regarding documentation and patient privacy are discussed. Instruction is provided by attorneys, a member of the state medical board, and other qualified physicians.

Credits: 1.5

FMED 1701

Family Medicine Core Rotation I

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The Family Medicine I core rotation consists of a four week experience in third year, which is primarily preceptor-based, but may include both ambulatory and inpatient settings. This service should expose the student to various aspects of the diagnosis and management of patients in a family medicine practice, including the incorporation of osteopathic principles and OMM. This experience is supplemented by small group tutorials, online cases and reading objectives.

Credits: 6

FMED 1702

Family Medicine Core Rotation II

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The Family Medicine II core rotation consists of a four week experience in third year, primarily preceptor-based, but may include both ambulatory and inpatient settings. This service should expose the student to various aspects of the diagnosis and management of patients in a family medicine practice, including the incorporation of osteopathic principles and OMM. This experience is supplemented by small group tutorials, online cases and reading objectives.

Credits: 6

FMED 1703

Primary Care Rotation

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Students may arrange for a Primary Care rotation either in Arizona, or at an out-of-state site. Any out-of-state site must be approved by the Department Chair who oversees that particular discipline. In addition, out-of-state rotations require an affiliation agreement or letter of understanding prior to the start of the rotation. This will be initiated by the Department of Clinical Education once the Chair's approval for the rotation has been obtained. Rotations may be done in family medicine, general internal medicine, general surgery, osteopathic manipulative medicine, pediatrics, med-peds, preventive medicine, occupational medicine, Hospice, palliative medicine, geriatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, and urgent care. No rotations with family members are permitted.

Credits: 6

HIST  1511

Histology/Embryology I

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In Histology, students study the structure of the cell and the distinguishing morphologic characteristics of the four types of tissues: epithelium, connective tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Students will learn how these four basic tissues are combined to form organs. This portion of the course focuses on the normal microscopic features of the lymphatic, circulatory, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems. In the Embryology component of the course, students learn the general pattern and principles of normal development and the basic aspects of development of the musculoskeletal, circulatory, and gastrointestinal systems. This course uses a lecture-based format. Examinations include both written and image-based practical questions.

Credits: 5

ICMD 1511

Introduction to Clinical Medicine I

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Introduction to Clinical Medicine I presents basic history and physical exam skills and provides laboratory experiences. Normal and abnormal findings are illustrated through clinical cases. The development of clinical reasoning skills is emphasized. Training is enhanced by guest lecturers, and history and physical experiences.

Credits: 3

ICMD 1522

Introduction to Clinical Medicine II

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Introduction to Clinical Medicine II presents basic history and physical exam skills and provides laboratory experiences. Normal and abnormal findings are illustrated through clinical cases. The development of clinical reasoning skills is emphasized. Training is enhanced by guest lecturers, blood draw and injection labs, and history and physical experiences.

Credits: 2

ICMD 1533

Introduction to Clinical Medicine III

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Introduction to Clinical Medicine III presents basic history and physical exam skills and provides laboratory experiences. Normal and abnormal findings are illustrated through clinical cases. The development of clinical reasoning skills is emphasized. Training is enhanced by standardized patients, guest lecturers, and history and physical experiences.

Credits: 2.3

ICMD 1614

Introduction to Clinical Medicine IV

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Introduction to Clinical Medicine IV, in the second year fall quarter, is a case-based curriculum that integrates the topics being taught in other second year courses into clinical application. Each week, a new case is presented, and students must obtain a history and physical examination on the patient. Students work in groups to determine problem lists, differential diagnoses, and initial treatment plans. Students write SOAP notes and prescriptions based on their clinical case. An in-depth discussion of the case topics, including differential diagnosis, history and physical, lab and x-ray findings, and disease management is provided by the faculty the following week. The afternoon sessions of this course provide further clinical correlations to the topics taught in basic science, with a strong focus on the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems, including EKG reading. Evidence-based medicine, study design, and biostatistics are introduced in this course, and the curriculum is delivered by faculty from various specialties.

Credits: 4.5

ICMD 1625

Introduction to Clinical Medicine V

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Introduction to Clinical Medicine V, in the second year winter quarter, is a case-based curriculum that integrates the topics being taught in other second year courses into clinical application. Each week, a new case is presented, and students must obtain a history and physical examination on the patient. Students work in groups to determine problem lists, differential diagnoses, and initial treatment plans. Students write SOAP notes, prescriptions, admission notes, and admission orders based on their clinical case. Use of an electronic medical record is introduced and encouraged. An in-depth discussion of the case topics, including differential diagnosis, history and physical, lab and x-ray findings, and disease management is provided by the faculty the following week. The afternoon sessions of this course provide further clinical correlations to the topics taught in basic science, with a strong focus on the gastrointestinal, renal, and genitourinary systems. More topics in evidence-based medicine and biostatistics are covered, and faculty from various specialties deliver the curriculum.

Credits: 4.5

ICMD 1630

Introduction to Clinical Medicine VI

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Introduction to Clinical Medicine VI, in the second year spring quarter, continues to link the preclinical and clinical years of the medical school curriculum. Clinical lectures concentrate on topics to ready the student for rotations. The case-based curriculum integrates the topics being taught in other second year courses into clinical application. Each week, a new case is presented, and students must obtain a history and physical examination on the patient. Students work in groups to determine problem lists, differential diagnoses, and initial treatment plans. Students write SOAP notes, prescriptions, admission notes, and admission orders based on their clinical case. Use of an electronic medical record is encouraged. An in-depth discussion of the case topics, including differential diagnosis, history and physical, lab and x-ray findings, and disease management is provided by the faculty the following week. Additional sessions of this course provide further clinical correlations to the topics taught in basic science, with a strong focus on the endocrine and dermatologic systems, as well as obstetrics and gynecology. More topics in evidence-based medicine and biostatistics are covered, and faculty from various specialties deliver the curriculum.

Credits: 3

IMED 1701

General Internal Medicine Core Rotation I

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During the third year, each student will participate in two 4-week rotations in internal medicine. This rotation includes internal medicine learned in hospital ward-based training or department-based training. Reading assignments, learning objectives, small group sessions, and lectures will supplement the clinical experience.

Credits: 6

IMED 1702

General Internal Medicine Core Rotation II

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During the third year, each student will participate in two 4-week rotations in internal medicine. This rotation includes internal medicine learned in hospital department-based training or ambulatory internal medicine. Reading assignments, learning objectives, small group sessions, and lectures will supplement the clinical experience.

Credits: 6

IMED 1803

Subspecialty Internal Medicine Core Rotation

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During the fourth year, each student will participate in at least one 4-week medical sub-specialty rotation in a discipline of their choice. Appropriate subspecialties include, but are not limited to Cardiology, Gastroenterology, Hematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, Pulmonology, Neurology, Infectious Disease, Nephrology, Immunology, and Endocrinology. Rotation specific reading objectives supplement the clinical experience for each specialty.

Credits: 6

IMED 1804-A

Critical Care Core Rotation

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Each fourth year student will participate in a 4-week Critical Care rotation. The objectives for this rotation include examining, studying and participating in the management of patients in the hospital critical care setting. The student will become familiar with many common and some uncommon presentations encountered by the critical care physician and observe and/or perform procedures indicated for each patient.

Credits: 6

IMED 1804-B

Surgical Intensive Care Unit Core Rotation (alt. choice to IMED 1804-A)

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During the fourth year, students may request to participate in a 4-week Surgical Intensive Care Unit Core Rotation (IMED 1804-B) as an alternative to a medical Critical Care Core Rotation (IMED 1804-A). Students must be selected and assigned by the Department of Surgery and Anesthesia before scheduling this rotation. The objectives for this rotation include examining, studying, and participating in the management of surgical patients in the hospital SICU setting. The student will become familiar with many common and some uncommon presentations encountered by surgeons and critical care physicians, and observe and/or perform procedures indicated for each surgical patient. Students will be responsible for all the required IMED 1804-A Critical Care Core rotation material as well as additional SICU material. Student must pass the 1804-A Critical Care Core Rotation 50 question exam as well as 15 additional SICU exam questions.

Credits: 6

MICR 1531

Immunology

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This course uses a didactic approach for a comprehensive coverage of immunology. Students are presented with information pertinent to fundamental principles of immunology, the cells and cell products involved in host defense mechanisms, their origin, function, and their roles in health, infectious processes, and in immunologic disorders and deficiencies.

Credits: 3

MICR 1611

Microbiology I

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This course covers basic morphologic, cultural, physiologic, and antigenic characteristics of microorganisms with special emphasis on factors pertinent to clinical medicine. Topics include the principles of microbial genetics and chemotherapy; an organ system approach to viral, bacterial, fungal, and parasitic agents of disease, and their biologic characteristics, natural history, public health importance, course of infection, and host interaction. Laboratory exercises and demonstrations help students develop the microbiologic skills applicable for clinical practice, acquaint students with available diagnostic laboratory tests and their interpretation.

Credits: 5

NEUR 1531

Neuroscience

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This course emphasizes the anatomy of the nervous system and clinical correlations related to the various pathways of the nervous system. The first unit studies surface landmarks, internal anatomy, and blood supply of the spinal cord, brainstem, and forebrain. This provides the framework and terminology for the remaining units, which adopt a systems approach to the study of the nervous system. Throughout the course, basic anatomy is presented in the context of neurological disorders that involve the system or pathway being studied.

Credits: 6.5

OBGY 1701

Obstetrics/Gynecology Core Rotation

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This third year, 4-week rotation is designed to provide the student with the fundamental knowledge base in Obstetrics and Gynecology. The student will be introduced to basic procedures relevant to the practice of OB/GYN, to facilitate an understanding of the approach to clinical problem solving in OB/GYN, and promote acquisition of skills in the diagnosis, management, and prevention of common obstetrical and gynecological conditions. Practice settings include both hospital ward-based and ambulatory center based sites.

Credits: 6

OMED 1511

Osteopathic Medicine I

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This course consists of weekly one-hour lectures followed by three-hour laboratory sessions. Instruction begins with an orientation to the osteopathic profession including the distinctive contribution of the osteopathic profession to the delivery of health care. The laboratory sessions reinforce lecture content and identify and develop the practical skills needed to diagnose and treat patients. Early laboratory periods emphasize palpation, identification of anatomic landmarks, evaluation of motion, and evaluation of soft tissues. Diagnostic and manipulative treatment procedures are also taught. Normal anatomy and physiology are emphasized. Students are evaluated by midterm and final written examinations and a practical examination.

Credits: 2.5

OMED 1522

Osteopathic Medicine II

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This course consists of weekly one-hour lectures followed by three-hour laboratory sessions. Laboratory session reinforce material presented in lectures and identify and develop the practical skills needed to diagnose and treat patients. Additional diagnostic procedures and manipulative treatment procedures will be taught in the laboratory. The course progresses into the pathophysiology of the musculoskeletal system and the structural-functional disturbances that can occur. Multiple classifications of technique are taught for clinical practice and to prepare for the national board examination. Students are evaluated by midterm and final written examinations and a practical examination.

Credits: 2.5

OMED 1533

Osteopathic Medicine III

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Osteopathic Medicine instruction consists of a weekly one-hour lecture followed by a three-hour laboratory session. Laboratory sessions are designed to reinforce material presented in lectures and to identify and develop the practical skills needed to diagnose and treat patients. Musculoskeletal findings and the somatic components of disease covering all organ systems are presented throughout the year. Students are evaluated by midterm and final written examinations and a practical examination. At the conclusion of the first year, the medical student is expected to demonstrate proficiency in diagnostic palpation and simple, basic manipulative procedures.

Credits: 2.5

OMED 1614

Osteopathic Medicine IV

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This course consists of weekly one-hour lectures followed by three-hour laboratory sessions. Laboratory sessions reinforce material presented in lectures. It also identifies and develops the practical skills needed to diagnose and treat patients. Additional diagnostic procedures and manipulative treatment procedures will be taught in the laboratory. The second year is an expansion and continuation of the previous year's work and the material is presented in the context of clinical problem solving. The sequence of material is coordinated with material presented in other second year courses. Students are evaluated by midterm and final written examinations and a practical examination.

Credits: 2.5

OMED 1625

Osteopathic Medicine V

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This course consists of weekly one-hour lectures followed by three-hour laboratory sessions. Laboratory sessions reinforce material presented in lectures and identifies and develops the practical skills needed to diagnose and treat patients. Additional diagnostic procedures and manipulative treatment procedures will be taught in the laboratory. The second year is an expansion and continuation of the previous year's work and the material is presented in the context of clinical problem solving. The sequence of material is coordinated with material presented in other second year courses. Students are evaluated by midterm and final written examinations and a practical examination.

Credits: 2.5

OMED 1636

Osteopathic Medicine VI

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This course consists of weekly one-hour lectures followed by three-hour laboratory sessions. Laboratory sessions reinforce material presented in lectures, identify, and develop the practical skills needed to diagnose and treat patients. Additional diagnostic procedures and manipulative treatment procedures will be taught in the laboratory. The second year is an expansion and continuation of the previous year's work and the material is presented in the context of clinical problem solving. The sequence of material is coordinated with material presented in other second year courses. Students are evaluated by midterm and final written examinations and a practical examination. At the culmination of the six quarters of instruction, there is a "Find It/Fix It" practical examination that tests the student's ability to diagnose and simulate treatment of an actual patient.

Credits: 2.5

PATH 1611

Pathology I

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This course introduces students to the basic concepts of pathology. It stresses altered cellular, genetic, and molecular mechanisms, and attempts to convey the dynamic nature of the processes involved. By focusing on the organism as a whole system, the discipline of pathology can provide a bridge for transition by showing the interrelationship between basic scientific principles and the practice of clinical medicine. This approach provides a complete, medical overview of the disease process in relation to its histological, functional, and structural changes. Students have an opportunity to develop the skills necessary to interpret and use laboratory data in describing and recognizing various types of injury to cells, tissues, and organs.

Credits: 6

PATH 1622

Pathology II

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A continuation of basic pathology, this course identifies the causes and mechanisms of disease as they relate to specific organ systems as well as stressing the need for the medical student to understand the pathophysiology of disease and its implications to both the patient and the physician. Emphasis is also placed on the dynamic process of the pathologic progression of changes, adaptive responses, and therapeutic modifications as well as discovering how all these changes produce the ultimate clinical manifestations of disease processes.

Credits: 6

PATH 1633

Pathology III

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A continuation of basic pathology, this course identifies the causes and mechanisms of disease as they relate to specific organ systems as well as stressing the need for the medical student to understand the pathophysiology of disease and its implications to both the patient and the physician. Emphasis is also placed on the dynamic process of the pathologic progression of changes, adaptive responses, and therapeutic modifications as well as discovering how all these changes produce the ultimate clinical manifestations of disease processes.

Credits: 5

PEDI 1701

Pediatric Core Rotation

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This third year, 4-week rotation is designed to introduce students to the management of common pediatric conditions. Emphasis is placed on obtaining a pediatric history, performing the physical examination, communicating with adult care givers, formulating differential diagnoses, and selecting appropriate diagnostic studies where appropriate. Students should be able to differentiate between normal and abnormal findings, provide patient and family education, provide well child examinations and anticipatory guidance, and begin to develop a cost effective management plan that incorporates referrals when necessary.

Credits: 6

PHAR 1611

Pharmacology I

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This course deals with the general principles of pharmacology, all aspects of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of drugs, mechanisms of drug actions, drug testing in humans, and prescription writing. In addition, this course describes in great detail the pharmacologic actions and clinical uses of autonomic and cardiovascular drugs, and the principles of toxicology.

Credits: 4

PHYS 1521

Physiology I

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This course presents the biophysics, functional properties, and regulation of membrane transport, excitable cells, skeletal muscle, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems. A discussion of circulatory fluid dynamics, peripheral vascular tone, blood pressure, and electrical and mechanical activity of the heart is included in the cardiovascular section of the course. Small group case discussions and workshops facilitate development of critical thinking and problem-solving skills as students use basic physiologic concepts to understand the pathogenesis of signs and symptoms in specific case studies.

Credits: 5.5

PHYS 1532

Physiology II

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This course is a sequel to PHYS 1521 and builds on physiologic foundations developed during the preceding semester. This course covers the function, mechanism of action, regulation, and integration of the renal and respiratory systems that maintain body homeostasis through fluid, electrolyte and gas balance. The endocrine section of the course presents the function, mechanism of action, and regulation of specific hormones and several special topics will be explored. Small group discussions will refine critical thinking and problem-solving skills as students identify physiologic and pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the signs and symptoms described in pertinent clinical case studies.

Credits: 5.5

PSYC 1511

Introduction to Human Behavior I

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This module begins with a course introduction which includes philosophy, course goals and Audience Response System (ARS) instruction. Students will be introduced to the three major medical models of practice followed by a discussion on professionalism in medical practice. The human life cycle is then covered beginning with childhood progressing through death and dying. Special topics covered during this term include human sexuality, forensic psychiatry and the mental status examination.

Credits: 1

PSYC 1522

Introduction to Human Behavior II

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The second module begins with a discussion and illustration of how to perform a psychiatric evaluation. The major psychiatric disorders covered include: disorders of childhood and adolescence, attention deficit disorder, cognitive disorders, psychotic disorders, personality disorders, anxiety disorders, and concludes with a discussion on suicide.

Credits: 1

PSYC 1533

Introduction to Human Behavior III

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This module will complete the review of the major psychiatric disorders including: somatiform disorders, eating disorders, dissociative disorders, sleep disorders, sexual disorders, psychiatric emergencies, violence and comorbidity, physician/patient boundaries in medical practice, and concludes with a discussion of student/physician well being.

Credits: 1

PSYC 1634

Psychopathology

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This course will focus on the treatment of the psychiatric disorders discussed in PSYC 1533. The diagnostic criteria presented in earlier classes will be briefly reviewed. The primary goal of this course will be to develop a bio-psychosocial treatment plan for the various psychiatric disorders. This will incorporate psychopharmacology, therapeutic modalities and coordination of care. The course will continue to utilize the Audience Response System (ARS) system to encourage group participation and enhance critical thinking. Case and video presentation will be used to demonstrate the psychopathology.

Credits: 1

PSYC 1701

Psychiatry Core Rotation

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This 4-week rotation is designed to provide the student with a fundamental knowledge of psychiatry. It will help facilitate an understanding of the approach to clinical problem solving in psychiatry, and promote the acquisition of skills for the diagnosis, management, and prevention of acute and chronic psychiatric conditions. Ambulatory, crisis and inpatient settings are utilized.

Credits: 6

RURL 1701

Rural/Underserved Medicine

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This third year required rotation focuses on the unique challenges faced when caring for patients in a rural or underserved area. Students complete a 4-week rotation in an area and specialty approved by the respective Department Chair.

Credits: 6

SURG 1701

General Surgery Core Rotation

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This third year, 4-week rotation is designed to provide the student with a fundamental knowledge of surgery and introduce the student to basic procedures relevant to the practice of general surgery. Ward based, department based, and preceptor based settings are offered. Determination of which type of rotation a student receives is based upon student preference, rotation availability and rotation site criteria. Final assignment is the sole discretion of the Department of Surgery and Anesthesia. Students are expected to learn how to diagnosis basic surgical diseases while acquiring the basic technical skills that they will need to be able to function efficiently and confidently in the operative theaters, thus maximizing their learning experience. Students are required to prepare and submit a case presentation to the Department for review. Students are required to complete the reading assignments listed in the Department of Surgery and Anesthesia Learning Objectives and utilize computerized examination test review questions in preparation for the Surgery Shelf Exam at the completion of the rotation. Final grade is composed of PRSP participation and quiz, Small Group Case Presentation, Rotation Evaluation by Preceptor and Shelf Exam score.

Credits: 6

SURG 1802

Subspecialty Surgery Core Rotation

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Students in the fourth year of training will complete a 4-week subspecialty surgery rotation. Building on the skills learned in the third year general surgery rotation, students may choose from a variety of surgical subspecialties such as Anesthesia, Cardiovascular Surgery, ENT, Orthopedics, Plastics, Surgical Oncology, Trauma, Urology or Vascular Surgery. There is no post-rotation exam for this course.

Credits: 6