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College of Health Sciences

Glendale, AZ Campus

Elective Course Descriptions

Clinical Psychology Program

Abbreviation/Number
Course Name

PSYC 1709

Forensic Psychology

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Building on basic information of the legal system and mental health law, students will gain a broad understanding of the ways in which psychologists interact with the legal system. This may include assessment, evaluation, treatment, testimony, and consultation.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

PSYC 1708 Mental Health Law

PSYC  1721

Human Sexuality

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The purpose of this course is to provide the Clinical Psychology student with an introduction to human sexuality throughout the life-cycle. Sexual development and issues affecting individuals and couples will be examined and sexual dysfunctions will be reviewed along with treatment modalities for the most common disorders.

Credits: 3

PSYC  1735

Practice Management Issues

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This course will introduce students to business principles as they apply to professional psychology. Students will be exposed to various business-of-practice issues and decisions, such as starting, managing, marketing, and diversifying a psychology practice, and will consider the related ethical, legal, and financial issues involved.

Credits: 3

PSYC 1748

Bullying and Interpersonal Violence

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Students will become aware of the causes of violence, the impact on victims of violence, and programmatic attempts to reduce violence. Students will explore current research regarding violence and learn prevention and treatment strategies.

Credits: 3

PSYC  1749

Psychological Management of Chronic Pain

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This course presents major theories and techniques of chronic pain management from the psychological perspective. Varying pain disorders, co-occurring disorders, treatment and management modalities, special populations, and relapse prevention will be explored.

Credits: 3

PSYC  1750

Stress Management, Relaxation and Hypnotherapy Techniques

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This course surveys stress management, relaxation and other techniques across theoretical orientations and philosophies that may be useful and effective in interventions to manage stress, reduce anxiety, and promote relaxation. Complementary and alternative medicine approaches, such as yoga and meditation, psychoneuoimmunology and its relationship to health, self-care skills, and health behavior change will be included.

Credits: 3

PSYC 1752

Treatment of Traumatic Stress

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This course covers fundamental skills in assessing and conceptualizing traumatic stress reactions and providing empirically-supported treatments to those affected by traumatic events. The course material includes readings and discussion on the physiological, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral impact of traumatic stress as well as instruction and practice in applying treatment techniques including relaxation training and biofeedback, Cognitive Processing Therapy, emotion regulation strategies, and exposure-based interventions. Students are also exposed to principles of psychological first aid to trauma victims as well as early intervention in crisis situations. All of the course material is presented in light of the cultural and contextual factors that influence the onset, course, and outcomes of psychological distress that results from exposure to traumatic events.

Credits: 3

PSYC 1753

Humanistic and Experiential Theory and Therapy

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This course provides the students with the principles and techniques of the Humanistic and Experiential models of therapy with a focus on the work of Rogers, May, Bugental, Mahrer, Perls, Greenberg, and Gendlin. Humanistic psychotherapy is a broad classification that embraces a diverse ensemble of approaches including the philosophy of the existential perspective, and poses two basic questions: What does it mean to be fully, experientially human; and how does that understanding illuminate the vital or fulfilled life? This course includes both didactic and experiential approaches. Through video demonstrations, role-play, and structured exercises, students will practice and further develop their intervention skills within an experiential framework. There will be an emphasis on the importance of presence and intent for authentic in-depth communication with both clinical and non-clinical populations. Experiential learning is an important aspect of this course in the examination of the relation between concepts and experiencing at the edge of awareness, where language emerges from non-language.

Credits: 3

PSYC 1775, 1776, 1777

Advanced Independent Study

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This course permits the student to pursue individualized study in a relevant area of clinical psychology under the direct supervision of program faculty. A study plan is developed in consultation with program faculty and with the approval of the Program Director.

Credits: 1-3 credits each course

Prerequisites

Approval of Program Director

PSYC 1778

Directed Readings in Clinical Psychology

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This course permits extensive exploration of an approved topic in clinical psychology. With the consultation of a program faculty member, a reading list is developed around a relevant issue. The readings focus on the interchange between theory, research, diversity issues, and clinical practice.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

Approval of Program Director

PSYC 1882, 1884, 1886, 1888

Advanced Elective Practicum I, II, III, IV

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This elective practicum experience offers the opportunity to enhance the student's skills in a particular area of interest.

Credits: 3 credits each course

PSYC 1883, 1885, 1887, 1889

Advanced Elective Practicum Seminar I, II, III, IV

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This seminar reviews the progress of students enrolled in the advanced elective practicum. Students meet to discuss training experiences.

Credits: 1 credit each course