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College of Veterinary Medicine

Glendale, AZ Campus

Core Education

College of Veterinary Medicine

Abbreviation/Number
Course Name

ANAT 1811, 1822, 1833

Veterinary Gross Anatomy I, II, III

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In this year long course series, students study regional anatomy in mammalian carnivores (dog and cat) and in the horse and ruminants. It will start with sequential study of the superficial anatomy, the body cavities, and associated body wall structures. Comparative vertebrate anatomy is the theme, with reference to primate anatomy as appropriate. Included in the dissection of each region are the major organs, glands, musculoskeletal, vascular, nervous and lymphatic components. This course involves lecture and dissection in the laboratory, and student progress is evaluated through written and laboratory-based practical examinations.

Credits: 5, 5, 4

HIST 1811

Veterinary Histology

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In the developmental component of this course, students learn the general pattern and principles of normal vertebrate development and the specific aspects of development of selected systems. In the microscopic anatomy component of this course, students study the structure of the cell and the distinguishing morphologic characteristics of the four types of tissues: epithelium, connective tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Students learn how these four basic tissues are combined to form organs. The focus will be on mammalian microscopic anatomy. This course involves lecture and workshop exercises, including microscopic investigations, and student progress is evaluated through written and image-based practical examinations.

Credits: 4

BIOC 1811

Applied Biochemistry

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This course emphasizes metabolic pathways and their thermodynamics and interrelationships in health and disease states of domestic animals. Protein, carbohydrate, nucleic acid, lipid metabolism and the regulation of these pathways by intracellular and hormonal mechanisms is considered. Biochemical processes related to clinical problem solving will be used to encourage the student to use the information in a clinical and applied context.

Credits: 3

BIOC 1822

Fundamentals of Veterinary Nutrition

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This course provides an overview of the identification, classification, and description of nutrient classes and function including factors that affect nutrient metabolism and availability in domestic animals. Skill development in feed identification, sampling techniques, evaluation, and analysis systems will be provided. Animal nutrient requirements during different physiological states of health and disease, principals of dietetics, and nutritional investigation will be emphasized.

Credits: 3

CVM 1511, 1522, 1533, 1544, 1555, 1566

Clinical Veterinary Medicine I, II, III, IV, V, VI

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These courses comprise a two year-long laboratory that will teach students fundamental clinical skills across a broad range of species. The course will utilize a combination of live animals, simulations, and cadavers. Extensive use of Clinical Simulations Laboratories will allow first year students to experience the complexities and nuances of client / patient / doctor interactions in a live, fully monitored instructional setting. Each course must be completed successfully in order to progress to the subsequent course.

Credits: 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1

CVM 1515, 1525, 1535

Professional Development I, II, III

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This course will enhance students’ knowledge of the veterinary profession and factors critical for their success. It will cover such topics as professional behavior, ethics, compassion, communication skills, medical records, and veterinary career paths (veterinarians from different career paths within the profession will share experiences in their field during each scheduled lecture).

Credits: Each course 1

CVM 1510, 1520, 1530, 1540, 1550, 1560

Small Group Exercise I, II, III, IV, V, VI

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These are full week courses at the beginning of each quarter (didactic courses will begin in Week 2). Students will meet in small groups (approximately 6-7 in size) with facilitators to discuss a clinical case related to the upcoming quarter’s didactic teaching. Case materials will be sequentially revealed as requested by students. The case discussions will necessitate that students do research and share information on a wide variety of basic and clinical science subjects involving small and large animals, public health, etc. Communication skills, as well as self- and peer evaluation, will be important.

Credits: Each course 2

PHYS 1811, 1822

Veterinary Physiology I, II

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This course series is a survey course introducing the vertebrate physiological principles and concepts common to both domestic and farm animals. The first course includes core principles relevant to the physiology of cells, cell signaling systems in health and disease, the role of the central nervous system in controlling movement, sensation, and perception, and cardiovascular mechanisms in health and disease. The first course also presents physiological processes and concepts relevant to gastrointestinal function in domestic and farm animals and includes lectures related to neuro-endocrine control of gastrointestinal function, oral digestion and deglutition, gastrointestinal motility and secretion, digestion and intestinal motility and transport, the pathophysiology of diarrhea and vomiting, the role of the pancreas and the liver in gastrointestinal function, and the control of motility. The second course will present physiological processes and concepts relevant to respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine and reproductive physiology in domestic and farm animals. Reproductive topics will include material on ovulation, sperm production and capacitation, reproductive patterns and maternal recognition of pregnancy in diverse species, mammary gland physiology, estrous synchronization in cattle, and unique reproductive issues in zoo, domestic, and farm animals.

Credits: 4

MICR 1722

Veterinary Immunology

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The first part of the course focuses on fundamental immunological concepts based primarily on what we know from humans and mice that will be applicable to most mammals. This will be followed by specific examples related to common veterinary species. The clinical immunology section of the course will incorporate case studies to apply basic immunology to veterinary disease, with weight preferentially give to those most conditions commonly encountered in practice (autoimmunity, hypersensitivities and cancer).

Credits: 3

MICR 1733, 1744

Veterinary Microbiology I, II

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The bacteriology portion of this course concentrates on diseases in domestic animals caused by pathogenic bacteria. Lectures emphasize basic properties of microorganisms, including identification and pathogenesis. Laboratory instruction includes basic bacteriology laboratory techniques, with hands-on application of identifying those organisms in the form of standard staining and microscope techniques, plating of cultures, and simple methods of identification of bacteria. The mycology portion of the course will present lectures on the biology of fungal pathogens of importance in veterinary medicine with emphasis on pathogenic mechanisms. Both sections will include discussion of important veterinary infectious diseases, their diagnosis, and treatment.

Credits: 4, 3

PHAR 1811, 1822

Veterinary Pharmacology I, II

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This course series covers the general principles of drug action, including mechanisms by which drugs exert their effects as well as administration, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of drugs in different species. In this course, the action of drugs on the autonomic nervous system, cardiovascular system, kidneys, respiratory and gastrointestinal tract will be discussed, as well as specific therapeutic uses, and the effects in various species. In the second quarter, students continue their study of general pharmacology, learning the effects of drugs on the central nervous system and the endocrine system. Drugs used for chemotherapy and for the treatment of various types of infectious disease will be covered in detail. The course will provide the veterinary student with information regarding drugs that are commonly used in veterinary practice and facilitate understanding of how those drugs act in different species.

Credits: Each course 3

PATH 1811, 1822, 1833

Veterinary Pathology I, II, III

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This three quarter course begins by introducing the student to general pathology, the bridging discipline that builds upon basic science knowledge to study the biochemical, structural, and functional changes that underlie disease. Concepts covered in the first quarter include normal and altered cell development, metabolic diseases, inflammation, cell aging and repair, immunopathology and neoplasia. In parts II and III, students apply their knowledge of general pathology to specific disease processes as they affect various organs or systems. Four aspects to be learned for each disease are etiology (cause), pathogenesis (mechanism of disease development), morphologic changes (both at the gross and microscopic level), and biochemical alterations. Laboratories will supplement course material with necropsy specimens and histopath slides to illustrate disease processes.

Credits: 4, 3, 3

NEUR 1833

Veterinary Neuroscience

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In this course, students study the anatomy of the mammalian nervous system and clinical correlations related to the various pathways of the nervous system. The first unit provides the framework and terminology for the remaining units, which adopt a systems approach to the study of the nervous system and include selected comparisons to non-mammalian nervous systems. The principles of conducting a complete neurologic examination will be presented. This course involves lecture only, and student progress is evaluated through written and image-based practical examinations.

Credits: 3

CVM 1610

Anesthesia / Pain Management

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This is an introduction to veterinary anesthetic agents and the principles of anesthesia in common veterinary species. The course will include pharmacology of anesthetic agents and how these agents interact with different species. It will also discuss the techniques of anesthesia in the various species encountered in veterinary practice, pre- and post-anesthetic assessment of clinical patients, and anesthetic complications.

Credits: 2

CVM 1615, 1625, 1635

Principles of Surgery, Surgery Labs I, II

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This year long course will introduce students to surgical and anesthesia techniques and give them the opportunity to practice in a wet lab, live animal setting. Aseptic technique, catheterization, intubation, basic surgical skills, and other techniques will be discussed in the earlier labs. Students will perform elective sterilization (ovariohysterectomy) on live dogs under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Students will participate in all aspects of the perioperative management of these patients (e.g. pre-anesthetic evaluation, induction and maintenance of general anesthesia, surgical preparation, performance of the surgery, postoperative recovery, and postoperative management). Students will work in groups of four. Each group will have lab once per week and students will rotate between being primary and secondary surgeon, anesthetist, and circulator.

Credits: Each course 2

MICR 1811

Veterinary Virology

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Students will examine the unique aspects of virus biology and natural history. The importance of replicative mechanisms of viruses to veterinary medicine will be emphasized. Specialized methods to detect and quantify viruses will be described. As survey of key virus families will introduce and highlight the agents of major veterinary significance.

Credits: 3

CVM 1810

Principles of Oncology

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As animal life expectancies have increased, so have the incidences of many neoplasms in both large and small animals. This course will begin with the basic science and pathophysiology of cancer. Later lectures will address specific neoplastic conditions and deal with how they are diagnosed and treated.

Credits: 3

CVM 1711, 1722, 1732, 1742

One Health

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This newly developed course takes advantage of the unique administrative and academic structure of Midwestern University where faculty members in a Division of Basic Sciences teach in multiple colleges involved with human, and now veterinary, medical education. The two required courses (Q5, 6) will present material traditionally related to veterinary epidemiology, zoonotic diseases, public health, evidence based decision making, and food safely with an eye to comparative (human) aspects whenever appropriate. Basic principles of population problems in veterinary medicine and investigative methods of disease outbreaks, the design of epidemiologic studies, and disease surveillance are included. How veterinary medicine impacts detection and prevention of bioterrorism, emerging infectious diseases, water-borne diseases, and disaster medicine will be discussed. Courses to be offered in the two “selective” slots (Q7, 8) are courses offered in other MWU Colleges. These include Research Design and Statistics, Ethics of Research and Experimentation, Writing for Publication, Emerging Infectious Diseases, the Natural History of Disease, and Issues in Bioterrorism.

Credits: 3, 3, 2, 2

PATH 1844

Veterinary Clinical Pathology

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This course introduces the student to the interpretation of laboratory tests. General principles of laboratory testing will be discussed on a system by system basis (hematopoietic, gastrointestinal, urinary, etc.) In group discussions, lab results will be presented and the students asked to develop differential diagnoses and follow-up plans. The course will include, but not be limited to, hematology, clinical chemistry, specialized chemical assays, body fluid analysis, protein analysis, and serology.

Credits: 3

MICR 1833

Veterinary Parasitology

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This course presents the protozoan, helminth, and arthropod parasites of animals, including those causing zoonotic diseases. Lectures will focus on parasite morphology, biology, and disease manifestations. Lab sessions will be sporadically introduced to reinforce lecture material, and provide students with opportunities to gain experience in identification of clinically-relevant parasites.

Credits: 3

CVM 1650

Veterinary Clinical Toxicology

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This course will introduce the most common toxins encountered in veterinary medicine with emphasis on the mechanism of action of these toxins, the pathophysiology in the animal body, clinical presentation of an animal exposed to toxins, and treatment of the toxic exposure.

Credits: 3

CVM 1812, 1822

Small Animal Medicine and Surgery I, II

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These courses will be a comprehensive discussion on medical and surgical disorders seen in small animal practice. Medical disorders of the endocrine, urinary, gastrointestinal, cardiopulmonary, and musculoskeletal systems will be discussed in detail. This course is designed to emphasize the clinical diagnosis and management of common diseases in companion animal species but will also discuss pathophysiology of the diseases. Orthopedic, soft tissue, and neurological conditions will be discussed in the surgical portion of the course, including pre- and post-operative management of patients. The first course is a prerequisite for the second and it must be completed successfully before advancing.

Credits: Each course 5

CVM 1813

Diagnostic Imaging

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This course will introduce the principles and techniques of radiology as well as the principles in radiologic diagnosis of commonly encountered conditions. The physics of other imaging modalities (MRI, CT, and ultrasound) will be discussed, as well as the principles of interpreting images of each of these modalities. The use of special radiology techniques, such as contrast studies, will also be covered.

Credits: 4

CVM 1815, 1825

Equine Medicine and Surgery I, II

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In this course, students will be introduced to principles of diagnosis and treatment of medical and surgical conditions found in the equine species. Emphasis will be placed on the clinical assessment of patients, clinical signs of common and uncommon diseases, clinical management of diseases, pharmacologic agents used in equine species, and fundamental techniques used in clinical practice.

Credits: Each course 3

CVM 1817, 1827

Food Animal Medicine and Surgery I, II

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Students will be introduced to common medical and surgical diseases of the bovine, porcine, caprine, and ovine species. The clinical presentation and treatment of common disorders and fundamental clinical techniques will be taught. Zoonotic disorders and importance of animals in the human food chain (relative to food-borne illness) will also be discussed.

Credits: Each course 3

CVM 1845, 1855

Large Animal Clinical Skills I, II

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The third year practicum is two individual courses in consecutive quarters. During this laboratory, students will learn to perform commonly employed clinical techniques on large animals.

Credits: Each course 2

CVM 1850

Business Principles, Ethics, Jurisprudence

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This is an introduction to veterinary practice business management and other topics. The course will include discussions on veterinary law, marketing a veterinary practice, business finances and other business-related topics, and professionalism. The importance of business and medical ethics to being successful will be presented and reinforced using real life examples.

Credits: 2

CVM 1840

Theriogenology

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This course will present normal reproductive functions in common domestic species and build on the reproductive portion of Physiology I, II. Diagnosis and management of common reproductive system disorders in large and small animals will also be presented.

Credits: 2