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Departments: Physiology

Osteopathic Medicine in Glendale


     The Department of Physiology at MWU Glendale has 7 faculty members and one administrative assistant who serve several healthcare programs including Osteopathic Medicine, Podiatric Medicine, Pharmacy, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant, Nurse Anesthesia, Dentistry, Optometry, and Biomedical Science. Three distinct physiology course sequences and an additional systems-based integrated course have been developed for these programs. Physiology 1521 and 1532 provide a strong physiological foundation for the DO and Podiatry programs and include a survey of organ system function and dysfunction in health and disease with specific clinical applications. Physiology 1501 and 1502 have been designed for students of Pharmacy and provides the physiological foundation that is required for the practice of Pharmacy.  Physiology 1571 and 1582 provide a strong corresponding foundation in physiology with clinical applications for the PA, PT, and NA programs. The Dentistry and Optometry programs are served by a special sequence in which the basic sciences are integrated into an organ system curriculum emphasizing normal function as well as alterations of function in specific disease states. Approximately 850 students per year are served by the Department of Physiology in all programs combined.

     The 7 full time faculty within the Department of Physiology at MWU-Glendale have diverse research interests including the mechanisms by which arachidonic acid and its eicosanoid metabolites influence renal function; the action and mechanism(s) of action of the naturally occurring phytoestrogen, genistein, on both intestinal and vascular function; the metabolic, endocrine, and cardiac consequences of diabetes and exercise training; the pathogenic sequence of events and development of  new treatments for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy; the mechanisms regulating tendon extracellular matrix in exercise and aging and the delineation of risk factors for tendon pathology; the role of caveolins in modulating insulin signaling; and the elucidation of mechanisms controlling water loss in desert arthropods. Two Research Assistants and one Laboratory Manager are employed by the department to assist the faculty in their research efforts. In addition, several students in the Biomedical Sciences MS program, several DO students taking university-funded summer research electives, and additional undergraduate or graduate level Laboratory Assistants assist the faculty in achieving their research objectives. In 2012, the Department of Physiology published 8 papers and presented 13 abstracts, all involving student research. In the 2011-2012 academic year, the faculty in Physiology held 3 active extramural grants and submitted 8 grant proposals to various federal and private agencies. The Department of Physiology at MWU-Glendale has a demonstrated commitment to promoting faculty research while providing students in diverse health professions the opportunity to conduct basic physiological research relevant to health and disease.


Physiology Department Courses

PHYS 1501: Human Physiology I  for Pharmacy
This course provides the core knowledge of physiology required by students to understand normal body function and the ability to analyze and interpret the immediate and long-term compensatory responses to common disease states of excitable cells (muscle and nervous tissue), the sensory system, and the endocrine and reproductive systems. Basic and applied terms are defined. Essential relationships between structure and function are defined and discussed.

PHYS 1502: Human Physiology II  for Pharmacy
This course provides core knowledge of physiology required by students of pharmacy in order to understand normal function and to acquire the ability to analyze and interpret the immediate and long-term compensatory responses to common disease states of the renal, cardiovascular, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems. Basic and applied terms are defined. Essential relationships between structure and function are defined and discussed.

PHYS 1571: Human Physiology I  for Health Sciences
In this two-quarter series, students are introduced to the basic physiological principles that underlie normal function of various organs and organ systems. Emphasis is given to developing an understanding of health in physiological terms and appreciating the diverse regulatory processes that maintain the homeostasis of the human body. Topics presented include a general study of cell function; properties of excitable cells; and the function of the neuromuscular, cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, digestive, endocrine, and reproductive systems.

PHYS 1582: Human Physiology II  for Health Sciences
In this two-quarter series, students are introduced to the basic physiological principles that underlie normal function of various organs and organ systems. Emphasis is given to developing an understanding of health in physiological terms and appreciating the diverse regulatory processes that maintain the homeostasis of the human body. Topics presented include a general study of cell function; properties of excitable cells; and the function of the neuromuscular, cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, digestive, endocrine, and reproductive systems.

PHYS 1521: Medical Physiology I  for AZCOM & Podiatry
This course presents the biophysics, functional properties, and regulation of membrane transport, excitable cells, skeletal muscle, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems. A discussion of circulatory fluid dynamics, peripheral vascular tone, blood pressure, and electrical and mechanical activity of the heart is included in the cardiovascular section of the course. Small group case discussions and workshops facilitate development of critical thinking and problem-solving skills as students use basic physiologic concepts to understand the pathogenesis of signs and symptoms in specific case studies.

PHYS 1532:
Medical Physiology II  for AZCOM & Podiatry
This course is a sequel to PHYS 1521 and builds on physiologic foundations developed during the preceding semester. This course covers the function, mechanism of action, regulation, and integration of the renal and respiratory systems that maintain body homeostasis through fluid, electrolyte and gas balance. The endocrine section of the course presents the function, mechanism of action, and regulation of specific hormones and several special topics will be explored. Small group discussions will refine critical thinking and problem-solving skills as students identify physiologic and pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the signs and symptoms described in pertinent clinical case studies.

BASI 1504 - 1508:
Integrated courses for Dentistry & Optometry


Faculty

Larry Alexander, PhD

Layla Al-Nakkash, PhD  -  Homepage

Tom Broderick, PhD

George Carlson, PhD, Chair

Chad Carroll, PhD

Michael Quinlan, PhD

Johana Vallejo-Elias, PhD

 


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