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Level II Fieldwork


LEVEL II FIELDWORK 

Level II fieldwork is an in-depth experience designed to develop competent entry- level, generalist occupational therapists. Students are supervised by registered occupational therapists who have a minimum of one year of practice experience.

LEVEL II COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVES

Course Description
This three month rotation is comprised of supervised field experience with clients and/or client groups who exhibit a variety of medical conditions, which include physical and/or psychosocial disabilities. This rotation emphasizes the development of disciplined, higher-level critical thinking skills necessary to plan and provide high- quality client care.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate task analysis in areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, activity demands, context(s) and environments, and client factors to formulate an intervention plan. (ACOTE Standard B.2.7).
  2. Use sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others and adhere to safety regulations throughout the occupational therapy process as appropriate to the setting and scope of practice. (ACOTE Standard B.2.8).
  3. Use standardized and nonstandardized screening and assessment tools to determine the need for occupational therapy intervention. These tools include, but are not limited to, specified screening tools; assessments; skilled observations; occupational histories; consultations with other professionals; and interviews with the client, family, significant others, and community. (ACOTE Standards B. 4.1).
  4. Evaluate client(s)' occupational performance in activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), education, work, play, rest, sleep, leisure, and social participation. Evaluation of occupational performance using standardized and nonstandardized assessment tools includes
    • The occupational profile, including participation in activities that are meaningful and necessary for the  client to carry out roles in home, work, and community environments.
    • Client factors, including values, beliefs, spirituality, body functions (e.g., neuromuscular, sensory and pain, visual, perceptual, cognitive, mental) and body structures (e.g., cardiovascular, digestive, nervous, genitourinary, integumentary systems).
    • Performance patterns (e.g., habits, routines, rituals, roles).
    • Context (e.g., cultural, personal, temporal, virtual) and environment (e.g., physical, social).
    • Performance skills, including motor and praxis skills, sensory-perceptual skills, emotional regulation skills, cognitive skills, and communication and social skills. (ACOTE Standard B.4.4 ).
  5. Interpret the evaluation data in relation to accepted terminology of the profession and relevant theoretical frameworks, and interdisciplinary knowledge. (ACOTE Standard B. 4.8).
  6. Document occupational therapy services to ensure accountability of service provision and to meet standards for reimbursement of services, adhering to the requirements of applicable facility, local, state, federal, and reimbursement agencies. Documentation must effectively communicate the need and rationale for occupational therapy services. (ACOTE Standard B. 4.10).
  7. Use evaluation findings based on appropriate theoretical approaches, models of practice, and frames of reference to develop occupation-based intervention plans and strategies (including goals and methods to achieve them) on the basis of the stated needs of the client as well as data gathered during the evaluation process in collaboration with the client and others. Intervention plans and strategies must be culturally relevant, reflective of current occupational therapy practice, and based on available evidence. Interventions address the following components:
    • The occupational profile, including participation in activities that are meaningful and necessary for the client to carry out roles in home, work, and community environments.
    • Client factors, including values, beliefs, spirituality, body functions (e.g., neuromuscular, sensory and pain, visual, perceptual, cognitive, mental) and body structures (e.g., cardiovascular, digestive, nervous, genitourinary, integumentary systems)
    • Performance patterns (e.g., habits, routines, rituals, roles).
    • Context (e.g., cultural, personal, temporal, virtual) and environment (e.g., physical, social).
    • Performance skills, including motor and praxis skills, sensory-perceptual skills, emotional regulation skills, cognitive skills, and communication and social skills. (ACOTE Standard B.5.1).
  8. Select and provide direct occupational therapy interventions and procedures to enhance safety, health and wellness, and performance in ADLs, IADLs, education, work, play, rest, sleep, leisure, and social participation. (ACOTE Standard B.5.2).
  9. Provide therapeutic use of occupation, exercises, and activities (e.g., occupation-based intervention, purposeful activity, preparatory methods). (ACOTE Standard B.5.3).
  10. Provide training in self-care, self-management, health management and maintenance, home management, and community and work integration. (ACOTE Standard B.5.5).
  11. Provide development, remediation, and compensation for physical, mental, cognitive, perceptual, neuromuscular, behavioral skills, and sensory functions (e.g., vision, tactile, auditory, gustatory, olfactory, pain, temperature, pressure, vestibular, proprioception). (ACOTE Standard B. 5.6).
  12. Demonstrate an understanding of health literacy and the ability to educate and train the client, caregiver, family and significant others, and communities to facilitate skills in areas of occupation as well as prevention, health maintenance, health promotion, and safety. (ACOTE Standard B. 5.18).
  13. Apply the principles of the teaching-learning process using educational methods to design experiences to address the needs of the client, family, significant others, colleagues, other health providers, and the public. (ACOTE Standard B. 5.19).
  14. Effectively communicate and work interprofessionally with those who provide services to individuals, organizations, and/or populations in order to clarify each member's responsibility in executing an intervention plan. (ACOTE Standard B.5.21).
  15. Select and teach compensatory strategies, such as use of technology and adaptations to the environment, that support performance, participation, and well-being. (ACOTE Standard B.5.24).
  16. Identify and demonstrate techniques in skills of supervision and collaboration with occupational therapy assistants and other professionals on therapeutic interventions. (ACOTE Standard B.5.25).
  17. Describe the role of the occupational therapist in care coordination, case management, and transition services in traditional and emerging practice environments. (ACOTE Standard B.5.27).
  18. Plan for discharge, in collaboration with the client, by reviewing the needs of the client, caregiver, family, and significant others; available resources; and discharge environment. This process includes, but is not limited to, identification of client's current status within the continuum of care; identification of community, human, and fiscal resources; recommendations for environmental adaptations; and home programming to facilitate the client's progression along the continuum toward outcome goals. (ACOTE Standard B.5.29).
  19. Terminate occupational therapy services when stated outcomes have been achieved or it has been determined that they cannot be achieved. This process includes developing a summary of occupational therapy outcomes, appropriate recommendations, and referrals and discussion of post-discharge needs with the client and with appropriate others. (ACOTE Standard B.5.31).
  20. Document occupational therapy services to ensure accountability of service provision and to meet standards for reimbursement of services. Documentation must effectively communicate the need and rationale for occupational therapy services and must be appropriate to the context in which the service is delivered. (ACOTE Standard B.5.32)
  21. Demonstrate knowledge of various reimbursement systems (e.g., federal, state, third party, private payer), appeals mechanisms, and documentation requirements that affect the practice of occupational therapy. (ACOTE Standard B.7.4)
  22. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics and Ethics Standards and AOTA Standards of Practice and use them as a guide for ethical decision making in professional interactions, client interventions, and employment settings. (ACOTE Standard B.9.1).

Methods of Evaluation of Student Learning
Students must complete all required assignments and obtain passing scores on the AOTA Fieldwork Performance Evaluation (FWPE) for the Occupational Therapist to pass their fieldwork affiliation:

The FWPE should be completed at Midterm and at completion of Fieldwork. A copy of the Midterm evaluation summary scores should be faxed to the Academic Fieldwork Coordinator at Midterm. The student is required to turn in the final FWPE to the Academic Fieldwork Coordinator upon completion of fieldwork. The final grade is determined by the Academic Fieldwork Coordinator and is based on FWPE scores, feedback from the fieldwork educator, and successful completion of course assignments.

If there is not a successful completion, the process of Academic Review as documented in the University Catalog will be implemented.

Ongoing communication between the students, the Academic Fieldwork Coordinator, and the Fieldwork Educator occurs through email, web-based course assignments, phone calls and site visits. The fieldwork educator and/or the student should contact the Academic Fieldwork Coordinator if there are any concerns at any time.


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