Midwestern University Home

Resources

Financial Aid: Eligibility Requirements


The U.S. Department of Education has established certain basic eligibility requirements for all federal financial aid. Individual Scholarship, Work Study, and Loan programs may have additional eligibility requirements.

To qualify for most types of aid, you must:

• Have a high school diploma or a General Education Development (GED) certificate.

• Be enrolled or accepted for enrollment as a student pursuing a degree or certificate.

• Be enrolled half-time;  six or more credit hours per quarter.

• Be a U.S. citizen, U.S. national, or an eligible noncitizen.

• An eligible noncitizen is defined as a U.S. permanent resident who has an Alien Registration Card (I-151, I-551, or I-551C). If you have an Arrival-Departure Record (I-94) from the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) showing "Refugee," "Asylum Granted," "Indefinite Parole," "Humanitarian Parole," "Cuban-Haitian Entrant," "Status Pending," or "Conditional Entrant" (valid only if issued before April 1, 1980), you are also eligible for aid.

• If you hold only a Notice of Approval to Apply for Permanent Residence (I-171 or I-464), you are not eligible for federal aid.

• If you are in the United States on an F1 or F2 student visa or a J1 or J2 exchange visitor visa, you are also not eligible for federal aid.

• While students who are not U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, or eligible noncitizens are not eligible for federal financial aid, they may be eligible for certain private loans with a U.S. citizen as a cosigner.

• Have a valid Social Security Number.

• Make satisfactory academic progress, as defined by Midwestern University, towards the completion of your degree or certificate.

• Sign a statement on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) certifying that you will use federal student aid only for educational purposes.

• Register with Selective Service, if required.

• The requirement to register applies to males who were born on or after January 1, 1960, are at least 18 years old, are citizens or eligible noncitizens, and are not currently on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces.

• Citizens of the Federated States of Micronesia, the Marshall Islands, or Palau are exempt from registering.

• Not be in default on a federal student loan and not owe money back on a federal student grant.

 

Loss of Eligibility Due to a Drug Conviction

A student who is convicted of a state or federal offense involving the possession or sale of an illegal drug that occurred while the student was enrolled in school and receiving Title IV aid is not eligible for Title IV funds. [An illegal drug is a controlled substance as defined by the Controlled Substance Act and does not include alcohol and tobacco.]

A borrower's eligibility is based on the student's self-certification on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Convictions that are reversed set aside or removed from the student's record or a determination arising from a juvenile court proceeding do not affect eligibility and do not need to be reported by the student.

A student who is convicted of a drug-related offense that occurred while the student was enrolled in school and receiving Title IV aid loses Title IV eligibility as follows:

For the possession of illegal drugs:

First offense: one year from the date of conviction.
Second offense: two years from the date of the second conviction.
Third offense: indefinitely from the date of the third conviction.

For the sale of illegal drugs:

First offense: two years from the date of conviction.
Second offense: indefinitely from the date of the second conviction.

A school must provide a student who loses Title IV eligibility due to a drug-related conviction with a timely, separate, clear, and conspicuous written notice. The notice must advise the student of his or her loss of Title IV eligibility and the ways in which the student may regain that eligibility.

Regaining Eligibility after a Drug Conviction

A student may regain eligibility at any time by completing an approved drug rehabilitation program and by informing the school that he or she has done so. A student regains Title IV eligibility upon successful completion of the program. A drug rehabilitation program is considered approved for these purposes if it includes at least two unannounced drug tests and meets one of the following criteria:

• The program received or is qualified to receive funds directly or indirectly under a federal, state, or local government program.

• The program is administered or recognized by a federal, state, or local government agency or court.

• The program received or is qualified to receive payment directly or indirectly from a federally or state licensed insurance company.

• The program is administered or recognized by a federally or state-licensed hospital, health clinic, or medical doctor.

For a student whose Title IV eligibility is reinstated after a drug conviction, the maximum loan period that a school may certify is within the academic year during which the student regains eligibility-- the school may not certify eligibility prior to the date on which eligibility is regained. A student who loses eligibility during a loan period is immediately ineligible to receive subsequent disbursements of Title IV Federal Loan funds and is required to repay any Title IV funds received after the date he or she lost eligibility. Schools are not required to recalculate a student's loan amount.

 


Bookmark and Share