Carleton 'Buck' Jones, Ph.D.

Associate Professor and Coordinator, Master of Biomedical Sciences Program


Midwestern University
College of Health Sciences
Biomedical Sciences Program
Cactus Wren 306F
19555 N 59th Ave.
Glendale, AZ 85308
Office: (623) 572-3667
e-mail: cjones@midwestern.edu

 

EDUCATION

B.S. Biology Central Washington University 1992
Ph.D. Pharmacology Washington State University 1999
Postdoc. Pharmacology Ohio State University

RESEARCH SUMMARY

The focus of our laboratory is on understanding the role of CNS and systemic inflammation in neurological pathologies, including spinal cord injury (SCI) and Alzheimer disease (AD). A major, ongoing project in the laboratory is to evaluate the role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the injured spinal cord, in particular, its influence on the phenotype of immune cells that infiltrate the CNS. Using a therapeutic treatment regimen, we have blocked various components of the RAS in SCI rats. By applying molecular and immunohistological techniques, we can determine the impact of our treatment on morphological indices of the spinal cord lesion. A newer, ongoing project is to evaluate the role of RAS activation on the onset of neuropathology and microglial phenotype in an apoE mouse model of AD.

Project I:

Our hypothesis is that activation of the RAS by traumatic SCI promotes the development of a pro-inflammatory phenotype in immune cells that infiltrate the injured spinal cord and contribute to secondary injury. Thus, treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers following SCI will modulate the immune response in such a way as to limit secondary injury and improve long-term functional recovery.

Simple model of the tissue renin
angiotensin system (RAS) and reported
effects on inflammation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Project II:

The RAS is known to mediate inflammatory responses in various CNS pathologies including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and stroke.  Data from the project described above indicate that inhibition of the RAS improves functional recovery following SCI.  However the normal expression and function of the RAS has not yet been thoroughly studied. In this study we are determining the expression of RAS genes in the thoracic spinal cord of the Sprague Dawley rats.

Illustration of the location for sequential
rostral
segments (R1, R2, R3, & R4) and
caudal segments (C1, C2, and C3) relative
to thoracic vertebra T8 for RAS analysis.

 

 

 

 

Selected Publications and Presentations

Andrew Ho, Monica Castro, Carleton B. Jones, T. Bucky Jones. The Role of APOE Status on Expression of TREM2 and Microglial Functional Phenotype. Alzheimer Association International Conference, Washington, D.C. (2015)

Christopher De Vera, Monica Castro, Carleton B. Jones, T. Bucky Jones. The Role of the Renin-Angiotensin System and Apolipoprotein E in a Sporadic Alzheimer Disease Mouse Model. Alzheimer Association International Conference, Washington, D.C. (2015)

C. De Vera, A. Ho, M. Castro1, B. Chavira, C.B. Jones, J. Valla, G. Jentarra, and T.B. Jones. The Role of Apolipoprotein E on the Renin-Angiotensin System in a Sporadic Alzheimer Disease Mouse Model. Arizona Alzheimer's Consortium, Tempe, AZ (2015)

T. Bucky Jones, Emily A. Robbins, A. Hanyu-Deutmeyer, and Carleton Jones. Improved functional recovery following spinal cord compression in rats treated with losartan is associated with reduced T cell influx into the injury site. FASEB J April 2015 29:708.3

T Bucky Jones and Carleton Jones. Th17 pathway genes are primarily downregulated by spinal cord injury. FASEB J April 2014 28:729.4

T. Bucky Jones, Emily A. Robbins, I. Gary Shlifer, Drew Manning, and Carleton B. Jones. Angiotensin receptor blockade accelerates functional recovery and alters intraspinal expression of inflammatory genes following spinal cord compression injury. FASEB Science Research Conference on Translational Neuroimmunology: From Mechanisms to Therapeutics, Carefree, AZ (2012)

Emily A. Robbins, I. Gary Shlifer, Drew Manning, Carleton B. Jones, and T. Bucky Jones. The Effects of Angiotensin Receptor Blockade on Functional Recovery and Inflammatory Gene Expression Following Spinal Cord Injury. FASEB J March 29, 2012 26:921.3

I. Gary Shlifer, DrueManning, Agnes Pascual, Carleton B. Jones, and T. Bucky Jones. Immune cell phenotype expression patterns in a compression model of spinal cord injury. American Osteopathic Association Research Conference, Orlando, FL (2011)

William P. Baker, Carleton 'Buck' Jones, & Elizabeth Hull. Take a Trip to the Biobank. The American Biology Teacher, 70(1): 44-47 (2008).

William P. Baker, Carleton 'Buck' Jones, & Elizabeth Hull. Modeling protein domain function. Science Activities. 44(2): 43-47 (2007).

William P. Baker, Elizabeth DeBeus, and Carleton 'Buck' Jones. The case for forensic toxicology. Science Activities 43(3): 3-8 (2006).

William P. Baker and Carleton B. Jones. FISH-ing for genes - Modeling Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization. The American Biology Teacher, 68(4): 227-231 (2006).