College of Health Sciences

Glendale, AZ Campus

Course Descriptions

Arizona School of Podiatric Medicine

Prerequisites are listed for those courses with such requirements. When no prerequisite is listed in a course description, it is implied that there is not a prerequisite.

Abbreviation/Number
Course Name

ANAT 1511

Gross Anatomy

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In this course, students approach the study of the human body in a regional manner with sequential study of the back, upper extremities, body wall, thoraco-abdominal cavity and contents. Included in the dissection of each region are the musculoskeletal, vascular, nervous and lymphatic components, relevant surface anatomy, and imaging of the region. The lectures and laboratories are coordinated with the Histology/Embryology course to provide an overall anatomic view of each region. This course involves lecture and dissection in the laboratory, and student progress is evaluated through written and practical examinations. In the second portion of the Gross Anatomy course, students continue their regional study of the body by examining the pelvis and perineum, lower extremities, and the head and neck. Regional coordination with the Histology/Embryology course continues. This course also involves lecture and dissection in the laboratory and testing by written and practical examinations. This course is taught during the Fall and Winter quarters with a single grade given at the completion of the course. 5 credits Fall Quarter, 5 credits Winter Quarter.

Credits: 10

BIOCG 1511

Biochemistry I

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Course modules feature proteins and enzymes emphasizing structure-function relationships; cell biology emphasizing how cells move and divide; molecular biology emphasizing the role of nucleic acids in expression of genetic information; and intermediary metabolism emphasizing metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids; and organs emphasizing the customization of biochemical pathways. Clinical aspects of biologic processes during the fed and fasted states are emphasized. Workshops introduce the biochemical basis of clinical laboratory tests and illustrate clinical applications of biochemical concepts. Offered in Pre-Clinical Block I, fall quarter.

Credits: 7

BIOCG 1522

Biochemistry II

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Course modules feature human nutrition emphasizing importance of nutrition in health and preventive medicine; human genetics emphasizing inheritance of selected genetic disorders; and cell cycle regulation and molecular basis of cancer; and various types of anemia focusing on biochemical and molecular basis; and hemostasis and its related topics. Workshops introduce the biochemical basis of common clinical laboratory tests and/or illustrate clinical applications of biochemical concepts. Selected workshops feature a modified problem-based learning environment. Offered in Pre-Clinical Block I, winter quarter.

Credits: 4

CORE 1560, 1570, 1580

Interdisciplinary Healthcare

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The Interdisciplinary Healthcare course involves the Colleges of Dental Medicine, Health Sciences, Optometry, Osteopathic Medicine, Pharmacy and Veterinary Medicine. The course is designed to teach all clinically-based students about each other's clinical programs, how they might interact together as part of an interdisciplinary healthcare team, and the importance of an interdisciplinary approach to patient care. The class consists primarily of online presentations that are delivered by interdisciplinary team members from each of the clinical programs. Associated quizzes will also be completed online. Occasional lectures, panel presentations, or group assignments may also be incorporated.

Credits: Each course 0.5

FMEDG 1531

Public Health, Medical Ethics and Jurisprudence

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The course covers topics and aspects of care necessary for the practice of evidence-based medicine, community medicine, and the provision of compassionate and humane patient care in accordance with law. Topics include an overview of the U.S. health system, epidemiologic study design and biostatistical methods, as well as the legal and ethical aspects of life and death, medical malpractice, professionalism, medical record documentation and patient privacy. Instruction is provided by epidemiologists, biomedical ethicists, attorneys, state medical board representatives, and other qualified topic experts. Offered in Pre-Clinical Block 1, spring quarter.

Credits: 2

HIST 1511

Histology/Embryology

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In Histology, students study the structure of the cell and the distinguishing morphologic characteristics of the four types of tissues: epithelium, connective tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Students will learn how these four basic tissues are combined to form organs. This portion of the course focuses on the normal microscopic features of the lymphatic, circulatory, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems. In the Embryology component of the course, students learn the general pattern and principles of normal development and the basic aspects of development of the musculoskeletal, circulatory, and gastrointestinal systems. This course uses a lecture-based format. Examinations include both written and image-based practical questions. The second Histology portion of the course continues with the microscopic examination of the urinary, reproductive, and endocrine systems and the eye and ear. The development of the urogenital system, the eyes, the face, and structures derived from the pharyngeal arches are the focus of the Embryology portion of this course. Regional coordination with the Gross Anatomy course also continues. This course uses a lecture-based format. Examinations include both written and image-based practical questions. This course is taught during the Fall and Winter quarters with a single grade given at the completion of the course. 5 credits Fall Quarter, 1.5 credits Winter Quarter.

Credits: 6.5

MICR  1531

Immunology

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This course uses a didactic approach for a comprehensive coverage of immunology. Students are presented with information pertinent to fundamental principles of immunology, the cells and cell products involved in host defense mechanisms, their origin, function, and their roles in health, infectious processes, and in immunologic disorders and deficiencies.

Credits: 3

MICR 1611

Microbiology

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This course covers basic morphologic, cultural, physiologic, and antigenic characteristics of microorganisms with special emphasis on factors pertinent to clinical medicine. Topics include the principles of microbial genetics and chemotherapy; an organ system approach to viral, bacterial, fungal, and parasitic agents of disease, and their biologic characteristics, natural history, public health importance, course of infection, and host interaction. Laboratory exercises and demonstrations help students develop the microbiologic skills applicable for clinical practice, acquaint students with available diagnostic laboratory tests and their interpretation. This course is taught during the Fall and Winter quarters with a single grade given at the completion of the course. 5 credits Fall Quarter, 5 credits Winter Quarter.

Credits: 10

NEUR  1531

Neuroscience

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This course emphasizes the anatomy of the nervous system and clinical correlations related to the various pathways of the nervous system. The first unit studies surface landmarks, internal anatomy, and blood supply of the spinal cord, brainstem, and forebrain. This provides the framework and terminology for the remaining units, which adopt a systems approach to the study of the nervous system. Throughout the course, basic anatomy is presented in the context of neurological disorders that involve the system or pathway being studied.

Credits: 6.5

PASS  1569

Physical Diagnosis

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This course is designed to teach the student the art and technique of physical assessment. Course content includes lectures and reading assignments covering normal and abnormal physical findings. In addition, there are weekly physical exam laboratory sessions designed to provide the student with hands-on practice in exam techniques. At the conclusion of the course the student will be expected to pass a written final exam and satisfactorily perform a complete physical examination.

Credits: 4

Prerequisites

ANAT 1511, 1522 Gross Anatomy I, II

PATH  1611

Pathology I

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This course introduces students to the basic concepts of pathology. It stresses altered cellular, genetic, and molecular mechanisms, and attempts to convey the dynamic nature of the processes involved. By focusing on the organism as a whole system, the discipline of pathology can provide a bridge for transition by showing the interrelationship between basic scientific principles and the practice of clinical medicine. This approach provides a complete, medical overview of the disease process in relation to its histological, functional, and structural changes. Students have an opportunity to develop the skills necessary to interpret and use laboratory data in describing and recognizing various types of injury to cells, tissues, and organs.

Credits: 6

PATH 1622, 1633

Pathology II, III

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A continuation of basic pathology, these courses identify the causes and mechanisms of disease as they relate to specific organ systems as well as stressing the need for the medical student to understand the pathophysiology of disease and its implications to both the patient and the physician. Emphasis is also placed on the dynamic process of the pathologic progression of changes, adaptive responses, and therapeutic modifications as well as discovering how all these changes produce the ultimate clinical manifestations of disease processes. These courses are taught during the Winter and Spring quarters. 6 credits Winter Quarter, 5 credits Spring Quarter.

Credits: 11

Prerequisites
  • Prerequisites for PATH 1622 Pathology II, 6 credits: PATH 1611 Pathology I
  • Prerequisites for PATH 1633 Pathology III, 5 credits: PATH 1622 Pathology II

PHAR 1611

Pharmacology

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This course deals with the general principles of pharmacology, all aspects of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of drugs, mechanisms of drug actions, drug testing in humans, and prescription writing. In addition, this course describes in great detail the pharmacologic actions and clinical uses of autonomic and cardiovascular drugs, and the principles of toxicology. Topics covered include the chemotherapy of microbial and parasitic diseases, chemotherapy of neoplastic diseases, drugs acting on blood and blood-forming organs, hormones and hormone antagonists, principles of toxicology, vitamins, gastric antacids, digestants, laxatives, antihistamines, and drugs causing birth defects. In addition, these courses include several lectures in clinical pharmacology. Workshops are conducted to demonstrate the application of pharmacologic principles in simulated human cases. In these presentations, emphasis is placed on problem solving, formulating hypotheses, making therapeutic decisions, and evaluating the patient's response to pharmacotherapy. This course is taught during the Fall, Winter and Spring quarters with a single grade given at the completion of the course. 4 credits Fall Quarter, 4 credits Winter Quarter, 3 credits Spring Quarter.

Credits: 11

PHYS  1521

Physiology I

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This course presents the biophysics, functional properties, and regulation of membrane transport, excitable cells, skeletal muscle, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems. A discussion of circulatory fluid dynamics, peripheral vascular tone, blood pressure, and electrical and mechanical activity of the heart is included in the cardiovascular section of the course. Small group case discussions and workshops facilitate development of critical thinking and problem solving skills as students use basic physiologic concepts to understand the pathogenesis of signs and symptoms in specific case studies.

Credits: 5.5

PHYS  1532

Physiology II

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This course is a sequel to PHYS 1521 and builds on physiologic foundations developed during the preceding semester. This course covers the function, mechanism of action, regulation, and integration of the renal and respiratory systems that maintain body homeostasis through fluid, electrolyte and gas balance. The endocrine section of the course presents the function, mechanism of action, and regulation of specific hormones and several special topics will be explored. Small group discussions will refine critical thinking and problem solving skills as students identify physiologic and pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the signs and symptoms described in pertinent clinical case studies.

Credits: 5.5

PMED 1512

Podiatric Medicine I

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This course introduces students to the podiatric medical profession and the role podiatric physicians play in healthcare delivery. Students will be introduced to basic podiatric and anatomical nomenclature and terminology. They will understand the importance of protecting both themselves and patients from bloodborne pathogens, learn the names and functions of common clinical instruments, and practice their use. Students will become familiar with common podiatric conditions and will be taught to perform a simple medical history and physical examination.

Credits: 1.5

PMED 1521

Biomechanics of Lower Extremity Function I

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This course introduces the principles of podiatric biomechanics including body planes and movement, normal locomotion, the mechanics of normal muscle and joint function, open and closed kinetic chain movement, and the basic biomechanical examination. Computer animation, videotapes, and live demonstrations are used to demonstrate normal gait patterns and the steps of a standard biomechanical examination. Practical labs are held to teach the proper techniques of biomechanical analysis whereby students examine one another.

Credits: 3

PMED 1531

Podiatric Surgery

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This course teaches the fundamental principles of surgery, including normal wound, tendon and bone healing. The peri-operative and postoperative management of a surgical patient are discussed along with basic concepts of hemostasis, patient positioning, and management of postoperative complications. Specific minor surgical techniques are discussed and practiced, including instrumentation, injection techniques, incision placement, suturing, knot tying and basic skin flaps. We also practice basic nail surgery and soft tissue mass excision techniques.

Credits: 3

PMED 1641

Podiatric Medicine II

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This course expands on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes developed in Part I. Focus will be placed on the management of the lower extremity manifestations of diabetes, infectious disease and peripheral vascular disease. The diagnosis, medical and surgical management of the diabetic foot, including lower extremity ulcerations, neuropathy and Charcot are discussed in detail. Infectious disease and wound care considerations will be presented in both lecture and lab formats, providing hands-on experiences with many of the advanced treatment options available today. Medical and surgical management of the vascular patient will be outlined, including the podiatrist role in diagnosis and management of the PVD patient.

Credits: 3.5

Prerequisites

ANAT 1511 Gross Anatomy; BIOC 1511, 1522 Biochemistry I, II; PHYS 1521, 1532 Physiology I, II; PMED 1512 Podiatric Medicine I.

PMED 1643

Lower Extremity Anatomy

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The purpose of this course is to provide students a firm foundation in the structure of the lower extremity. The course will emphasize a functional and clinical approach to the study of the anatomy of the lower extremity. The anatomical terminology learned will be the vocabulary necessary to understand podiatric surgery, radiology, orthopedics and biomechanics. This knowledge is essential to the podiatrist's assessment of a patient's status, and in the interpretation of laboratory and diagnostic tests; and in learning pathology.

Credits: 6.5

Prerequisites

ANAT 1511 Gross Anatomy

PMED 1644

Medical Imaging

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This course will introduce the student to special imaging (MRI, CT scan, bone scan, and diagnostic ultrasonography) and how it pertains to the diagnosis of foot and ankle pathology. Emphasis will be given to the physics and interpretation as well as the appropriate times to order these tests. Students will also learn the proper technique in performing a diagnostic ultrasound.

Credits: 2

Prerequisites

ANAT 1511 Gross Anatomy

PMED 1651

Biomechanics of Lower Extremity Function II

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Biomechanics of Lower Extremity Function II is designed to provide a comprehensive study of biomechanics with an emphasis on normal and abnormal structure and function. General treatment concepts will be considered for a range of conditions with special emphasis on orthosis therapy and footwear correlated to the clinical setting. Short presentations will be followed by hands-on exercises for clinical application.

Credits: 3.5

Prerequisites

PMED 1521 Biomechanics of Lower Extremity Function I

PMED 1662

General Medicine I

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General Medicine I includes an introduction to clinical nutrition and its clinical correlation to the disease states in the cardiovascular and hematology systems. Students study diseases of the cardiovascular, pulmonary and hematology systems through the integration of the basic and clinical sciences. Case-based approaches are used in addition to didactic instruction.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

PASS 1569 Physical Diagnosis; PHYS 1521, 1532 Physiology I, II

PMED 1663

Podiatric Pathomechanics

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Pathomechanics informs students of the common deformities that occur in the foot that have underlying biomechanical etiologies. Students correlate the abnormal mechanics of the foot with the selection of and techniques utilized for surgical correction. The clinical skills component will demonstrate the components and techniques used in basic internal fixation, the skills and techniques used in the radiographic assessment of a Hallux Abducto Valgus deformity and proper dressing application.

Credits: 3.5

Prerequisites

PMED 1512 Podiatric Medicine I; PMED 1521, 1651 Biomechanics of Lower Extremity Function I, II; PMED 1531 Podiatric Surgery; PMED 1643 Lower Extremity Anatomy; PMED 1644 Medical Imaging

PMED 1672

General Medicine II

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General Medicine II includes geriatrics, gastroenterology and nephrology. Students study diseases of the genitourinary and gastrointestinal systems and study issues related to aging through the integration of the basic and clinical sciences. Case-based approaches include a required written history and physical examination and a case presentation is used in addition to didactic instruction.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

PASS 1569 Physical Diagnosis; PHYS 1521, 1532 Physiology I, II; PMED 1662 General Medicine I

PMED 1675

Pediatric Orthopedics

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Pediatric Orthopedics is designed to provide the podiatric medical student with a comprehensive understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of normal and abnormal pediatric lower extremity conditions and pediatric gait patterns. This course includes lectures on child development, normal pediatric growth, ontogeny, common pediatric foot and ankle deformities, pediatric arthritides, congenital abnormalities, pediatric radiographs, and common pediatric gait problems.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

ANAT 1511 Gross Anatomy; PMED 1521 Biomechanics of Lower Extremity Function I

PMED  1678

Behavioral Medicine

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This course is designed to introduce the AZPod student to the major psychopathologies they may encounter in daily practice. Emphasis is placed on diagnosis and treatment. Case histories and audio-visual presentations will enhance the student's understanding of the material presented.

Credits: 1.5

PMED 1722

Advanced Podiatric Surgery

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This course expands on the principles discussed in both Pathomechanics and Podiatric Surgery with a focus on rearfoot and reconstructive surgical principles. The emphasis will include the entire treatment course from early detection and diagnosis to conservative and surgical management. The topics of discussion include conditions such as heel pain, flat feet, cavus foot, subtalar and ankle joint arthrosis, arthroscopy of the foot and ankle, total ankle arthroplasty and the use of external fixation. Lectures are augmented with case presentations and critical evaluation of current and past literature.

Credits: 2

Prerequisites

PMED 1512, 1641 Podiatric Medicine I, II; PMED 1521, 1651 Biomechanics of Lower Extremity Function I, II; PMED 1531 Podiatric Surgery; PMED 1643 Lower Extremity Anatomy; PMED 1644 Medical Imaging; PMED 1663 Podiatric Pathomechanics

PMED 1723

Emergency Medicine and Trauma

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This course is designed to expose the student to different facets of emergency medicine and trauma. This includes office emergency care, pre-hospital care, and emergency room care. Further, an introduction to the trauma patient with specific emphasis on lower extremity trauma will be discussed. Detailed lectures on classification, non-surgical and surgical management of all foot and ankle fractures will be discussed. The interpretation of imaging for the diagnosis and management of such trauma will be emphasized. The entire course will use a combination of clinical case presentations, lectures, and simulation exercises to help students learn this complicated aspect of podiatric medicine.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

PMED 1512 Podiatric Medicine I; PMED 1531 Podiatric Surgery; PMED 1641 Podiatric Medicine II; PMED 1662, 1672, 1732 General Medicine I, II, III; PMED 1722 Advanced Podiatric Surgery

 

 

PMED 1724

Orientation to the Operating Room & Anesthesia

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This course is a hands-on introduction to operating room protocol. In the format of a skills lab conducted in the surgical suite, students will learn basic aseptic technique, the proper methods of gowning and gloving, sterile prep and draping of the patient, the safe handling of sharps, and maintenance of a sterile field. The student will also learn the basics for administering and monitoring of general anesthesia and learn the peri-operative management of surgical patients.

Credits: 1.5

Prerequisites

PMED 1512 Podiatric Medicine I; PMED 1531 Podiatric Surgery

PMED 1725, 1726

Clinical Correlates in Podiatric Medicine, Biomechanics and Surgery

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These one credit online courses will serve as a step toward residency interview preparation and clinical case presentations, and will nurture an appreciation for comprehensive understanding of podiatric medicine, biomechanics, and surgery. Clinical Correlates uses small group discussion/interaction and student presentations to meet the course objectives. The courses will review selected topics previously reviewed in the AZPod curriculum as they pertain to advanced clinical knowledge and skills. These courses are taught during the Winter and Spring quarters.

Credits: Each course 1

PMED 1732

General Medicine III

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General Medicine III includes endocrinology and neurology. Students study endocrine and nervous system diseases through the integration of the basic and clinical sciences. Case-based approaches are used in addition to didactic instruction.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

NEUR 1531 Neuroscience; PASS 1569 Physical Diagnosis; PHYS 1521, 1532 Physiology I, II; PMED 1662, 1672 General Medicine I, II

PMED  1734

Practice Management

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Students will have the opportunity to build upon their experiences and mentorship by learning the "how and why" of podiatric practice management and the relationship with quality patient care and a gratifying professional and personal life. The course will follow the development of an overall business plan and will be largely driven by the preparation of products that the student can use later when building a practice.

Credits: 2

PMED 1741

Podiatric Dermatology

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Students learn to recognize, diagnose, and manage cutaneous disorders that commonly manifest in the lower extremities. Case-based instruction is employed.

Credits: 2.5

Prerequisites

MICR 1611 Microbiology; PMED 1512, 1641 Podiatric Medicine I, II

PMED 1742

Research, Community Health and Evidence Based Medicine

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This course explores the relationships between research, community health, and evidence based healthcare. The subjects covered include: research methodology, bioethical issues related to human subject research, the role of the Institutional Review Board, research protocol writing, public health system, disease prevention and control, clinical epidemiology and biostatistics. Current and clinically relevant articles will be used for problem-based analysis.

Credits: 2

Prerequisites

FMED 1531 Clinical Ethics/Medical Jurisprudence

PMED 1751

Applied Clinical Biomechanics

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This course will serve as a final step toward clinical practice and will nurture an appreciation for comprehensive understanding of lower extremity biomechanics. The course will cover currently accepted concepts as well as introduce new theories under investigation in the field of podiatric biomechanics. This course will illustrate the power and dynamic nature of biomechanics within clinical podiatric practice.

Credits: 2

Prerequisites

PMED 1521, 1651 Biomechanics of Lower Extremity Function I, II; PMED 1643 Lower Extremity Anatomy; PMED 1663 Podiatric Pathomechanics

PMED 1773

Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation

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This course introduces the student to the evaluation, diagnosis and management of athletic injuries. This course will also present various physical therapy evaluative techniques and modalities used in the rehabilitation of athletic injuries. The clinical skills component will include exam techniques for specific athletic injuries, application and use of immobilizing devices, physical therapy modalities, and assessment of running shoes and proper bike fit.

Credits: 2.5

Prerequisites

PMED 1512, 1641 Podiatric Medicine I, II; PMED 1521, 1651 Biomechanics of Lower Extremity Function I, II; PMED 1643 Lower Extremity Anatomy; PMED 1644 Medical Imaging

PMED 1774

General Orthopedics and Disorders of Bone

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This course is designed to introduce the student to many of the conditions that afflict the bone. Topics will include osseous tumors and an extensive review of the rheumatologic conditions that can manifest in the lower extremity. In preparation for orthopedic and trauma rotations, conditions that affect the spine, hip, knee and upper extremity are also reviewed. The clinical skills component is designed to demonstrate to the student the classic radiographic findings seen with the more commonly encountered bone tumors.

Credits: 2.5

Prerequisites

PMED 1512, 1641 Podiatric Medicine I, II; PMED 1521, 1651 Biomechanics of Lower Extremity Function I, II; PMED 1643 Lower Extremity Anatomy; PMED 1644 Medical Imaging