College of Health Sciences

Glendale, AZ Campus

Elective Course Descriptions

Clinical Psychology Program

Abbreviation/Number
Course Name

PSYCG 1709

Forensic Psychology

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Building on basic information of the legal system and mental health law, students will gain a broad understanding of the ways in which psychologists interact with the legal system. This may include assessment, evaluation, treatment, testimony, and consultation.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

PSYCG 1708 Mental Health Law

PSYCG 1712

Grief and Loss

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This course focuses on the concepts of grief and loss in psychology. Major issues as established by the Association for Death Education and Counseling (ADEC) will be covered including: Dying, End-of-Life Decision Making, Loss, Grief and Mourning, Assessment and Intervention, Traumatic Death and Death Education. Both didactic and experiential methods of instruction will be used to expose students to the vast body of knowledge covering this area.

Credits: 3

PSYCG 1715

Animal Assisted Psychotherapy

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Animal Assisted Psychotherapies (AAT), as well as their theoretical foundations, are reviewed in this course. Both canine assisted psychotherapy (CAP) and equine assisted psychotherapy (EAP) approaches will be addressed as well as brief discussions of AAT with other animals. There is an emphasis on developing skills in case analysis and treatment, with special attention to the development and processing of treatment activities.

Credits: 3

PSYCG 1716

Introduction to Neuropsychological Assessment

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This course provides an introduction to the assessment of brain-behavior relationships. A variety of neuropsychological tests will be introduced, covering the major cognitive domains in Neuropsychology, with an emphasis on the process by which such tests are interpreted, in light of all the data available, including historical, interview, observational, and test data.

Credits: 3

PSYCG 1721

Human Sexuality

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The purpose of this course is to provide the Clinical Psychology student with an introduction to human sexuality throughout the life-cycle. Sexual development and issues affecting individuals and couples will be examined and sexual dysfunctions will be reviewed along with treatment modalities for the most common disorders.

Credits: 3

PSYCG 1735

Practice Management Issues

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This course will introduce students to business principles as they apply to professional psychology. Students will be exposed to various business-of-practice issues and decisions, such as starting, managing, marketing, and diversifying a psychology practice, and will consider the related ethical, legal, and financial issues involved.

Credits: 3

PSYCG 1743

Introduction to Neuropsychological Assessment

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This course is for intermediate students in the neuropsychology concentration. This course provides an introduction to the assessment of brain-behavior relationships. A variety of neuropsychological tests will be introduced, covering the major cognitive domains in Human Neuropsychology, with an emphasis on the process by which such tests are interpreted, in light of all the data available, including historical, interview, observational, and test data.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

PSYCG 1515 Tests and Measurements I; PSYCG 1516 Tests and Measurements II; PSYCG 1524 Intelligence Testing I; PSYCG 1525 Intelligence Testing II; PSYCG 1550 Biological Bases of Behavior; PSYCG 1640 Introduction to Neuropsychology; PSYCG 1620 Advanced Assessment; PSYCG 1510 Statistics; PSYCG 1514 Research Methods and Design; PSYCG 1560 Cognitive-Affective Bases of Behavior

PSYCG 1745

Advanced Neuropsychological Assessment

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This course is for advanced students in the neuropsychology concentration. The course will use a case conference format to explore advanced topics in neuropsychological assessment including a more comprehensive understanding of functional neuroanatomy and central nervous system functioning, treatment and assessment of diverse populations, clinical ethics, clinical interventions for neuropsychological conditions and other special topics. Emphasis is on exploration of special topics using a single case format with each student presenter responsible for helping to guide discussion for that week.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

PSYCG 1515 Tests and Measurements I; PSYCG 1516 Tests and Measurements II; PSYCG 1524 Intelligence Testing I; PSYCG 1525 Intelligence Testing II; PSYCG 1550 Biological Bases of Behavior; PSYCG 1640 Introduction to Neuropsychology; and PSYCG 1743 Introduction to Neuropsychological; PSYCG 1560 Cognitive-Affective Bases of Behavior; PSYCG 1510 Statistics; PSYCG 1514 Research Methods and Design; PSYCG 1508 Fundamentals of APA Style; PSYCG 1509 Fundamentals of Graduate Level Writing; and PSYCG 1565 Professional Writing

PSYCG 1747

Advanced Practicum Seminar Neuropsychological Track

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The practicum is a supervised field experience for clinical psychology students in the neuropsychology track. It focuses on the development of clinical inquiry skills, knowledge of interventions, assessment ability, knowledge of community resources, diversity issues, and consultation skills with an emphasis on neuropsychological assessment and neurorehabilitation. The practicum is a supervised experience that may take place at hospitals, clinics, human service agencies, schools, or appropriate organizations. Students participating in the practicum are under the direct supervision of a site supervisor and also receive feedback from faculty and advanced students in the clinical psychology program. The practicum seminar is a place to integrate field training experience with course content, to practice skills, and develop a professional attitude.

Credits: 1

Prerequisites

PSYCG 1640 Introduction to Neuropsychology; PSYCG 1683, 1685, 1687, and 1689 Practicum Seminar I, II, III, IV

PSYCG 1748

Bullying and Interpersonal Violence

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Students will become aware of the causes of violence, the impact on victims of violence, and programmatic attempts to reduce violence. Students will explore current research regarding violence and learn prevention and treatment strategies.

Credits: 3

PSYCG 1749

Psychological Management of Chronic Pain

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This course presents major theories and techniques of chronic pain management from the psychological perspective. Varying pain disorders, co-occurring disorders, treatment and management modalities, special populations, and relapse prevention will be explored.

Credits: 3

PSYCG 1750

Stress Management, Relaxation and Hypnotherapy Techniques

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This course surveys stress management, relaxation and other techniques across theoretical orientations and philosophies that may be useful and effective in interventions to manage stress, reduce anxiety, and promote relaxation. Complementary and alternative medicine approaches, such as yoga and meditation, psychoneuoimmunology and its relationship to health, self-care skills, and health behavior change will be included.

Credits: 3

PSYCG 1752

Treatment of Traumatic Stress

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This course covers fundamental skills in assessing and conceptualizing traumatic stress reactions and providing empirically-supported treatments to those affected by traumatic events. The course material includes readings and discussion on the physiological, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral impact of traumatic stress as well as instruction and practice in applying treatment techniques including relaxation training and biofeedback, Cognitive Processing Therapy, emotion regulation strategies, and exposure-based interventions. Students are also exposed to principles of psychological first aid to trauma victims as well as early intervention in crisis situations. All of the course material is presented in light of the cultural and contextual factors that influence the onset, course, and outcomes of psychological distress that results from exposure to traumatic events.

Credits: 3

PSYCG 1753

Humanistic and Experiential Theory and Therapy

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The course Humanistic and Experiential Theory and Therapy provides the students with the principles and techniques of the Humanistic and Experiential models of therapy with a focus on the work of Rogers, May, Bugental, Mahrer, Perls, Greenberg, and Gendlin. Humanistic psychotherapy is a broad classification that embraces a diverse ensemble of approaches including the philosophy of the existential perspective, and poses two basic questions: What does it mean to be fully, experientially human; and how does that understanding illuminate the vital or fulfilled life? This course includes both didactic and experiential approaches. Through video demonstrations, role-play, and structured exercises, students will practice and further develop their intervention skills within an experiential framework. There will be an emphasis on the importance of presence and intent for authentic in-depth communication with both clinical and non-clinical populations. Experiential learning is an important aspect of this course in the examination of the relation between concepts and experiencing at the edge of awareness, where language emerges from non-language.

Credits: 3

PSYCG 1760

Advanced Child Therapy

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This course is designed to provide exposure, practice, and research on therapeutic orientiation and techniques with children and adolescents. Focus will be on how to incorporate developmental models into conceptualization, treatment planning, and treatment outcome, as well as on current evidence-based counseling and intervention methods dealing with issues relevant to children and adolescents. Additional areas of focus will include discussion about ethical issues in treatment with minors, involving family/caregivers/school-based systems, accessing community supports, and the impact of diversity on the child’s functioning and treatment.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

PSYCG 1502 Life Span Development I and PSYCG 1530 Introduction to Psychotherapy

PSYCG 1775, 1776, 1777

Advanced Independent Study

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This course permits the student to pursue individualized study in a relevant area of clinical psychology under the direct supervision of program faculty. A study plan is developed in consultation with program faculty and with the approval of the Program Director.

Credits: Each course 1-3

Prerequisites

Approval of Program Director

PSYCG 1778

Directed Readings in Clinical Psychology

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This course permits extensive exploration of an approved topic in clinical psychology. With the consultation of a program faculty member, a reading list is developed around a relevant issue. The readings focus on the interchange between theory, research, diversity issues, and clinical practice.

Credits: 3

Prerequisites

Approval of Program Director

PSYCG 1882, 1884, 1886, 1888

Advanced Elective Practicum I, II, III, IV

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This elective practicum experience offers the opportunity to enhance the student's skills in a particular area of interest.

Credits: Each course 3

PSYCG 1883, 1885, 1887, 1889

Advanced Elective Practicum Seminar I, II, III, IV

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This seminar reviews the progress of students enrolled in the advanced elective practicum. Students meet to discuss training experiences.

Credits: Each course 1