College of Veterinary Medicine

Glendale, AZ Campus

Core Education

College of Veterinary Medicine

Prerequisites are listed for those courses with such requirements. When no prerequisite is listed in a course description, it is implied that there is no prerequisite.

Abbreviation/Number
Course Name

ANATG 1555, 1556

Veterinary Anatomy I, II

See More

In these courses students will learn mammalian developmental, microscopic, and gross anatomy. Lecture and laboratory material will concentrate on canine anatomy, with comparisons to feline, equine and ruminant species. Included in the dissection of each region are the musculoskeletal, vascular, nervous and lymphatic components, and clinically relevant surface anatomy. Embryology lectures cover the general patterns and principles of normal mammalian development as well as specific aspects of the development of selected systems and species. Microanatomy lectures present basic cytology, tissue types, and specific organ systems

Credits: 6

BIOCG 1555

Veterinary Biochemistry

See More

This course emphasizes metabolic pathways, and their thermodynamics and interrelationships in health and disease states of domestic animals. Nucleic acid, protein, carbohydrate, and lipid metabolism, and the regulation of these pathways by intracellular and hormonal mechanisms are considered. Biochemical processes related to clinical problem solving will be used to encourage the student to use the information in a clinical and applied context.

Credits: 3

BIOCG 1566

Fundamentals of Animal Genetics and Nutrition

See More

This course provides an overview of biochemical genetics. The identification, classification, and description of nutrient classes and their functions will also be covered, including factors that affect nutrient metabolism and availability in domestic animals. Skill development in feed identification, sampling techniques, evaluation, and analysis systems will be provided. Animal nutrient requirements during different physiological states of health and disease, principals of dietetics, and nutritional investigation will be emphasized.

Credits: 3

COREG 1560, 1570, 1580

Interprofessional Healthcare

See More

The Interprofessional Healthcare course involves the Colleges of Dental Medicine, Health Sciences, Optometry, Osteopathic Medicine, Pharmacy and Veterinary Medicine. The course is designed to teach all clinically-based students about each other's clinical programs, how they might interact together as part of an interprofessional healthcare team, and the importance of an interprofessional approach to patient care. The class consists primarily of online presentations that are delivered by interprofessional team members from each of the clinical programs. Associated quizzes will also be completed online. Occasional lectures, panel presentations, or group assignments may also be incorporated.

Credits: Each course 0.5

MICRG 1522

Veterinary Immunology

See More

This course focuses on fundamental immunological concepts based primarily on what we know from humans and mice that will be applicable to most mammals. This will be followed by specific examples related to common veterinary species. The clinical immunology section of the course will incorporate case studies to apply basic immunology to veterinary disease, with emphasis on conditions most commonly encountered in practice (autoimmunity, hypersensitivities and cancer).

Credits: 3

MICRG 1671, 1672

Veterinary Microbiology I, II

See More

The bacteriology portion of this course concentrates on diseases in domestic animals caused by pathogenic bacteria. Lectures emphasize basic properties of microorganisms, including identification and pathogenesis. Laboratory instruction includes basic bacteriology laboratory techniques, with hands-on application of identifying those organisms in the form of standard staining and microscope techniques, plating of cultures, and simple methods of identification of bacteria. The mycology portion of the course will present lectures on the biology of fungal pathogens of importance in veterinary medicine with emphasis on pathogenic mechanisms. Both sections will include discussion of important veterinary infectious diseases, their diagnosis, and treatment.

Credits: 4, 3

MICRG 1673

Veterinary Parasitology

See More

This course presents the protozoan, helminth, and arthropod parasites of animals, including those causing zoonotic diseases. Lectures will focus on parasite morphology, biology, and disease manifestations. Lab sessions will be sporadically introduced to reinforce lecture material, and provide students with opportunities to gain experience in identification of clinically-relevant parasites.

Credits: 3

PHARG 1660, 1661

Veterinary Pharmacology I, II

See More

The course will provide students with information regarding drugs that are commonly used in veterinary practice and facilitate understanding of how those drugs act in different species. This course covers the general principles of drug action, including mechanisms by which drugs exert their effects, as well as administration, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of drugs in different species. The action of drugs on the autonomic nervous system, cardiovascular system, kidneys, respiratory and gastrointestinal tract will be discussed, as well as specific therapeutic uses, and the effects in various species. In the second quarter, students continue their study of general pharmacology, learning the effects of drugs on the central nervous system and the endocrine system. Drugs used for chemotherapy and for the treatment of various types of infectious disease will be covered in detail.

Credits: 3

PHYSG 1512

Veterinary Physiology I

See More

This is a survey course introducing the vertebrate physiological principles and concepts common to both domestic and farm animals. The course includes core principles relevant to the physiology of cells, cell signaling systems, and cardiovascular and respiratory mechanisms in health and disease.

Credits: 3

PHYSG 1522

Veterinary Physiology II

See More

This course is a continuation of Veterinary Physiology I in which basic physiological principles relevant to veterinary practice with domestic and farm animals are surveyed. It includes core concepts in renal and acid-base physiology, and the role of the central nervous system in controlling movement, sensation, and perception.

Credits: 2

Prerequisites

PHYSG 1512 Veterinary Physiology I

PHYSG 1533

Veterinary Physiology III

See More

A continuation of Veterinary Physiology II, this course presents physiological processes and concepts relevant to endocrine, reproductive and gastrointestinal function in healthy and diseased domestic and farm animals

Credits: 4

Prerequisites

PHYSG 1522 Veterinary Physiology II

VMEDG 1501, 1502, 1503, 1604, 1605, 1606, 1707, 1708

Practice of Veterinary Medicine I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII

See More

The Practice of Veterinary Medicine is an eight-course series designed to teach veterinary students the clinical and communication skills necessary to become competent and successful veterinarians. The main objective of these courses is for the student to build the foundational clinical skills, qualities, and personal conduct essential for a successful career in the veterinary profession.

Credits: 4 credits 1501; subsequent sections 3

VMEDG 1520

Clinical Anatomy

See More

This course is a clinically oriented follow-up to ANATG 1555 and 1556 and will emphasize anatomical features for the most relevant clinical disorders, as well as medical and surgical techniques specific to veterinary medicine. Normal anatomy as observed by commonly employed imaging procedures (radiography, ultrasound, CT, and MRI) will be presented as a prelude to the clinical imaging course later in the curriculum. Students will have the opportunity to learn clinical anatomy as it relates to small and large animals in both wet labs and live animal labs.

Credits: 4

VMEDG 1531

Anesthesia / Pain Management

See More

This course introduces the basic principles of anesthesia and analgesia (pain management); students will gain the knowledge, skills and critical decision-making needed to conduct competent administration of general and regional anesthesia and pain management in veterinary practice. Clinically-relevant pharmacology, equipment selection and use, patient monitoring and support, patient risk identification and anesthetic complication management in different species encountered in veterinary practice will be emphasized. Integrated pain management concepts will be introduced, including perioperative multi-modal techniques, regional blockade, analgesic infusions and chronic pain management in both companion animals and large animals.

Credits: 5

VMEDG 1571

Boving Theriogenology Skills Lab

See More

This is a laboratory course providing instruction and experience in management of reproduction in cattle and horses. Reproductive tract palpation per rectum and other skills will be practiced.

Credits: 1

VMEDG 1591, 1592

One Health I, II

See More

This course sequence is an opportunity for first year students to learn about investigational, clinical, and diagnostic aspects of disease affecting both animals and people. The emphasis will not be on the organisms causing the diseases, but on why and how disease outbreaks occur and how new diseases come to affect people, pets, and livestock.

Credits: 3, 2

VMEDG 1635

Diagnostic Imaging

See More

This is an introductory course in diagnostic imaging. Digital radiography, fluoroscopy, nuclear scintigraphy, MRI, CT, and ultrasound will be discussed, along with the principles of interpreting images of each of these modalities in various disease conditions. The use of special radiology techniques, such as contrast studies, will also be covered.

Credits: 3

VMEDG 1641, 1642

Veterinary Pathology I, II

See More

This course begins by introducing the student to general pathophysiologic mechanisms which cause disease including biochemical, structural, and functional changes. Concepts covered in the first quarter include normal and altered cell development, metabolic diseases, inflammation, cell aging and repair, immunopathology and neoplasia. In part II, students apply their knowledge of general pathology to specific disease processes as they affect various organs or systems. Four aspects to be learned for each disease are etiology (cause), pathogenesis (mechanism of disease development), morphologic changes (both at the gross and microscopic level), and biochemical alterations. Laboratories will supplement course material with necropsy specimens and histopath slides to illustrate disease processes.

Credits: 5, 5

VMEDG 1645

Clinical Pathology

See More

This course introduces the student to the interpretation of laboratory tests. General principles of laboratory testing will be discussed on a system by system basis (hematopoietic, gastrointestinal, urinary, etc.) In group discussions, lab results will be presented and students asked to develop differential diagnoses and follow-up plans. The course will include, but not be limited to, hematology, clinical chemistry, specialized chemical assays, body fluid analysis, protein analysis, and serology.

Credits: 4

VMEDG 1648

Clinical Toxicology

See More

This course will introduce the most common toxins encountered in veterinary medicine with emphasis on the mechanism of action of these toxins and the pathophysiology in the animal body. Clinical presentation of animals exposed to various toxins, and treatment of the toxic exposure, will also be presented.

Credits: 2

VMEDG 1651, 1652, 1653

Principles of Surgery, Surgery Labs I, II, III

See More

This year-long course will introduce students to surgical principles and anesthetic techniques. The students will have the opportunity to practice in wet lab and live animal settings. Aseptic technique, intravenous catheterization, tracheal intubation, basic surgical skills, and other techniques will be emphasized. Students will participate in all aspects of the perioperative management of patients (e.g. pre-anesthetic evaluation, induction and maintenance of general anesthesia, surgical preparation, performance of the surgery, postoperative recovery, and postoperative management).

Credits: 4 credits, subsequent sections 2

VMEDG 1655, 1756, 1757

Small Animal Medicine and Surgery I, II, III

See More

These courses will be interactive discussions on medical and surgical disorders based on presenting clinical signs seen in small animal practice. Disorders of the endocrine, neurological, reproductive, hematopoietic, ophthalmologic, urinary, gastrointestinal, cardio-pulmonary, musculoskeletal, and immune systems will be discussed in detail. This course is designed to emphasize the clinical diagnosis and management of common diseases in companion animal species, but will also discuss pathophysiology of the diseases. Medicine and surgery, including pre- and post-operative management of surgical patients will be integrated in the course to emphasize the problem-based approach to management of small animal patients.

Credits: 5, 5, 5

VMEDG 1761, 1762

Equine Medicine and Surgery I, II

See More

In this course students will be introduced to principles of diagnosis and treatment of medical and surgical conditions found in the equine species. Emphasis will be placed on the clinical assessment of patients, signs of common and uncommon diseases, management of diseases, pharmacologic agents used in equine species, and fundamental techniques used in clinical practice.

Credits: 4, 4

VMEDG 1766, 1767

Food Animal Medicine I, II

See More

Students will be introduced to principles of diagnosis and treatment of medical and surgical conditions found in the bovine, porcine, caprine, and ovine species. The clinical presentation and treatment of common disorders and fundamental clinical techniques will be taught. Zoonotic disorders and importance of animals in the human food chain (relative to food-borne illness) will also be discussed.

Credits: 4, 3

VMEDG 1776

Lab Animal and Exotic Species Medicine

See More

This course will provide students with an introduction to the husbandry and medical care of species not covered in other small and large animal clinical course. Career options in laboratory animal medicine and exotic/zoological medicine will be presented.

Credits: 3

VMEDG 1801

Small Animal Primary Care

See More

Students will spend a 6-month continuous block functioning as primary care practitioners. During this time, students will work in groups of two and will have primary responsibility for all aspects of primary care for dogs and cats in the Companion Animal Clinic of the Animal Health Institute. These groups of students will be supervised by experienced primary care veterinarians who will be responsible for oversight of 6 – 8 teams of students each. Students will be scheduled to see office calls and do procedures comparable to a high-functioning small animal primary care practice. There will also be designated daily times for teaching rounds. These rounds will be case-based and will involve students, generalists, and specialists across disciplines. In addition to rounds, board-certified internists and surgeons will also be available to the students for consultation as needed, but the students will largely function as independent clinician pairs. This will give the students the opportunity to learn a realistic approach to clinical practice. Students will follow up on their own cases as the primary care clinicians for their patients. Students will maintain their own medical records, prescribe treatments and diets, provide wellness/preventive medicine services, and do everything that a primary care practitioner does.

Credits: 39