Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine

Downers Grove, IL Campus

Course Descriptions

Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine

Prerequisites for courses may be established by the department that administers the course. Prerequisites are recommended to the Curriculum Committee for approval and are listed within the course description in the catalog. On a case-by-case basis, prerequisites may be waived upon approval of the chair of the department that delivers the course.

Abbreviation/Number
Course Name

ANATD 1511

Histology (F)

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In Histology, students study the structure of the cell. They learn the distinguishing morphologic characteristics of the four types of tissue: epithelium, connective tissue, muscle, and nervous tissue. After acquiring this basic knowledge, students then learn how the four tissues combine to form organs. At the conclusion of the course, students are able to identify any organ based upon its microscopic morphology.

Credits: 3

ANATD 1521

Neuroscience (S)

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This is a clinically oriented lecture-based course complemented with a laboratory component featuring lectures on neurobiology, principles of neuroscience and clinical neuroscience. It is an integrated, interdisciplinary course in which the students learn to identify and describe the structural components and corresponding functions of the human nervous system. Emphasis is given to correlating underlying lesions involving these structures with neurologic deficits and dysfunctions likely to be encountered in clinical practice. Integrated lectures are given by basic science and clinical faculty.

Credits: 6

ANATD 1550

Gross Anatomy/Embryology (F,W)

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In Gross Anatomy and Embryology, students will study the human body in a regional approach. Through lectures and dissection laboratories, students will learn to apply anatomical knowledge to clinical practice. Students will study the embryological basis of adult anatomy, as well as the developmental basis of important malformations. This course is taught during the Fall and Winter quarters with a single grade given at the completion of the course.

Credits: 9

BIOCD 1501

Biochemistry I (F)

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This course features lectures on basic concepts in biochemistry, cell biology and metabolism, along with small group activities that highlight these biochemical concepts to clinical case studies. Clinical correlations are featured in lectures and interpretation of laboratory data are emphasized. Integration of carbohydrate, protein and lipid metabolism, and organ specific metabolism in health and disease are discussed.

Credits: 5

BIOCD 1502

Biochemistry II (W)

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This course features lectures on human nutrition, molecular biology and genetics in normal development and diseases, including the medical genetics of hereditary disorders and cancer. Clinical correlations are featured in lectures and interpretation of laboratory data using clinical case studies are emphasized in workshops that involve small groups.

Credits: 4.5

CLIND 1430

Research Design, Methods and Approaches (W)

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The focus of this course is to provide students with general research methodology training. Students will learn how to evaluate the medical literature, develop research questions, test hypotheses, and identify appropriate statistical analysis. Students will complete NIH and CITI training required for work and research in a clinical setting. This course is completed online and is self-paced.

Credits: 1

CLIND 1500

Health Care Communication I (W)

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This course introduces students to the fundamental principles for the effective communication with patients, families and significant others of the patient. Using material gleaned from the empirical and clinical domains of Behavioral Medicine, the course focuses on patient-centered approaches for promoting, improving, and maintaining dialogue with patients. Effective communication has been shown to be central to patient satisfaction, professional satisfaction, patient adherence to treatment plans, and positive outcomes for the patient.

Credits: 1

CLIND 1502

Foundations of Osteopathic Clinical Practice (F)

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Foundations of Osteopathic Clinical Practice is a course for first year students that focuses on their professional development. The topics that have been selected are designed to prepare the student for clinical rotations and clinical practice. They include medical terminology, biomedical statistics, and basic research techniques. In addition, topics such as physician wellness and cultural awareness are discussed in order to promote physician self-knowledge and communication skills. An introduction to population health and the medical education system is also provided to familiarize students with the health care system.

Credits: 1

CLIND 1503

Behavioral Health Assessment (S)

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This module introduces psychopathology with descriptive, dynamic and behavioral analyses of typical Behavioral Health syndromes. Emphasis is etiology, assessment and indications for referral. The use of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders as the major diagnostic reference is presented.

Credits: 2

CLIND 1550

Patient Symptom Presentations (F,W,S)

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Patient Symptom Presentations acquaints osteopathic medical students with the clinical knowledge associated with the practice of medicine, enabling them to integrate the knowledge gained in the basic science courses into a patient’s presenting symptoms. As part of the required activities, students participate in discussions about symptom-based presentations of simulated patients. This course is taught by practicing osteopathic physicians during the Fall, Winter and Spring quarters with a single grade given at the completion of the course.

Credits: 6.5

CLIND 1551

Physical Exam Skills (F,W,S)

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Physical Exam Skills is a workshop designed to teach osteopathic medical students the basic skills associated with history taking and physical examination. This course integrates with CLIN 1550 Patient Symptom Presentation as well as the basic science courses. Students participate in a simulated patient program where they learn to perform a physical examination with normal findings emphasized. Standardized Patients are incorporated into the course as early as the first few weeks. As part of the PES workshop, students have opportunities to experience early clinical contact with actual patients as well. This workshop is taught by practicing osteopathic physicians during the Fall, Winter and Spring quarters with a single grade given at the completion of the course.

Credits: 2

CORED 1599A

Interprofessional Healthcare (F)

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Changes in our healthcare delivery system are creating a growing demand for health professionals with skills in collaboration and teamwork. This course will describe the roles and responsibilities of the various healthcare disciplines. It will also provide students, from different health professions, the opportunity to interact with one another as well as simulated patients. This collaboration will promote communication using a team-based approach to the maintenance of health and management of disease.

Credits: 1

OMEDD 1550, 1551

Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine (F,W,S)

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The first year OMM curriculum is divided into two year-long component courses, a lecture course (OMEDD 1550) and a laboratory course (OMEDD 1551). While laboratory sessions are designed to reinforce material presented in lectures, each course is graded independently. Instruction consists of one hour of lecture plus three hours of lab each week. The lecture course covers the didactic study of osteopathic principles and theory. The laboratory course focuses on each student's ability to identify and develop the practical skills needed to diagnose and treat patients from an osteopathic standpoint. Laboratory sessions provide an excellent opportunity for medical students to ask questions and to practice diagnosis and treatment techniques on a variety of body types. Closed circuit television is used to enhance the effectiveness of demonstrations. Instruction begins with an orientation to the osteopathic profession (including history and philosophy of osteopathic medicine) and an examination of the distinctive contribution of the osteopathic profession to the delivery of health care. Normal anatomy and physiology are also emphasized. Early laboratory sessions emphasize palpation, identification of anatomic landmarks, evaluation of motion, and evaluation of soft tissues. The course then progresses into the pathophysiology of the spine with a description of the structural-functional disturbances that occur in the spine. The skills of articulation, range of motion procedures, Muscle Energy method, cranial osteopathic method, Counterstrain method, Myofascial Release method, and High Velocity thrust (HVLA) method are taught. Neurobiological mechanisms in manipulative treatment and their clinical manifestations are also presented. At the conclusion of the first year, medical students are expected to have mastered palpation, diagnosis, and simple basic manipulative procedures. Multiple written examinations and practical examinations are administered throughout the academic year to evaluate student competency with the above mentioned skills. These two courses are taught during the Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters with a single grade given at the completion of each course.

Credits: 5 total

PHYSD 1501

Physiology I (W)

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This course presents the biophysics, functional properties and regulation of excitable cells, skeletal muscle, autonomic nervous system and cardiovascular systems. A discussion of the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart, circulatory fluid dynamics, control of peripheral vascular tone, and neurohumoral control of blood pressure will be included in the cardiovascular section of the course. Small group case discussions facilitate the development of critical thinking and problem-solving skills as the students use basic physiologic concepts to understand the pathogenesis of signs and symptoms in clinical case studies.

Credits: 4

PHYSD 1502

Physiology II (S)

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This course is a sequel to PHYSD 1501 that builds on the physiological foundations developed during the preceding quarter. The initial section of the course presents the function, mechanism of action, regulation and integration of the respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal organ systems that maintain body homeostasis through fluid, electrolyte, acid-base and nutritional balance. The endocrine and reproductive physiology sections of the course present the function, mechanism of action and feedback regulation of hormonal systems. Small group discussions continue to refine critical thinking and problem-solving skills as the students identify the physiologic and pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the signs and symptoms described in clinical case studies.

Credits: 5.5

CLIND 1603

Mental Illness and Treatments (S)

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This module focuses on major psychiatric issues and mental health problems that individuals often confront such as substance abuse, addiction, cognitive disorders, death, bereavement, mental retardation, developmental disorders and psychiatric factors associated with medical conditions. The course emphasizes the pharmacological therapies as well as clinical issues associated with psychiatric practice.

Credits: 1.5

CLIND 1650

Clinical Symptom Integration (F,W,S)

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Clinical Symptom Integration (CSI) builds upon and reinforces content taught in the first year with a focus on symptoms that prompt patients to seek medical care. Within this class, the students are guided to a higher level of clinical thinking. Presentations from primary care physicians as well as specialists incorporate prior academic subject material and build upon it with a clinical focus. This course consists of presentations coordinated and conveyed sequentially during the Fall, Winter, and Spring. A single grade is given at the completion of the course.

Credits: 15

CLIND 1651

Simulated Patient Care (F,W,S)

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Simulated Patient Care workshop builds upon and reinforces information presented in the Clinical Symptom Integration class with a focus on actual patient care skills. Actual patients as well as Standardized Patients are incorporated into the course. The class focuses on problem solving and the development of skills necessary for the transition to the clinical rotations. This course is taught by practicing osteopathic physicians during the Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters with a single grade given at the completion of the course.

Credits: 5

MICRD 1651

Infectious Disease, Etiologic Agents and the Immune Response (F,W)

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This course covers both the etiologic agents of infectious diseases and the host immune responses to those agents. This course begins by focusing on fundamental principles of immunology, antigenic characteristics of microorganisms, the cells and mediators involved in host defense mechanisms against pathogens and tumor antigens, lymphatic recirculation and lymphatic flow. Next, the course delves into the basic classification, structure, metabolism and genetics of bacteria, viruses, protozoa, helminthes, and fungi. From that point on, lectures and laboratories use the organ systems approach to examine the etiologic agents of infectious disease and the associated immunopathology including immune-mediated hypersensitivities. Clinical correlations and case presentations are featured for each organ system. This course is taught over multiple quarters with a single grade given at the completion of the course.

Credits: 13

OMEDD 1650, 1651

Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine (F,W,S)

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The second year OMM curriculum is divided into two year-long component courses, a lecture course (OMEDD 1650) and a laboratory course (OMEDD 1651). While lab sessions are designed to reinforce material presented in lectures, each course is graded independently. The lecture course (one hour weekly) covers the didactic study of osteopathic principles and theory. The laboratory course (1.5 hours weekly) focuses on each student's ability to identify and develop the practical skills needed to diagnose and treat patients from an osteopathic standpoint. Lab sessions provide an excellent opportunity for medical students to ask questions and to practice diagnosis and treatment techniques on a variety of body types. High definition cameras and flat screen monitors are used to enhance the effectiveness of demonstrations. The second year curriculum is an expansion of the first year curriculum, with a dominant focus on organ systems as contrasted to anatomic regions. A complete spectrum of direct and indirect osteopathic manipulative methods is taught. At the conclusion of the second year, medical students are expected to have mastered diagnosis, advanced manipulative procedures, and the ability to formulate a treatment plan for patient complaints in the clinical setting. Multiple written examinations and practical examinations are administered throughout the academic year to evaluate student competency with the above mentioned skills. These courses are taught during the Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters with a single grade given at the completion of each course.

Credits: 4.5 total

Prerequisites

Satisfactory completion of OMEDD 1550, OMEDD 1551, ANATD 1550, and ANATD 1521

PATHD 1601

Pathology I (F)

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The first half of the course focuses on the basic concepts and principles of pathology by analyzing the basic inherent mechanisms that underlie all disease processes. Students will develop an understanding for the processes of cellular injury and adaptation, inflammation and repair, neoplasia, hemodynamic disorders and basic laboratory values and analysis. This section of the course stresses the cellular, genetic, pathophysiologic and molecular alterations which underlie all disease processes and emphasizes their dynamic nature. The second half of the course introduces students to the study of specific disease processes utilizing an organ systems approach.

Credits: 5

PATHD 1602, 1603

Pathology II and III (W,S)

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These courses are a continuum of the organ system approach to the study of human disease introduced in PATHD 1601. The causes and pathophysiologic mechanisms of disease pertaining to specific organ systems are emphasized along with their anatomic, histologic and physiologic alterations. The implications of these disease processes to both the patient and physician are examined. The relationships between specific organ system diseases and their systemic implications are also emphasized.

Credits: PATHD 1602 - 6 credits; PATHD 1603 - 4.5

PHARD 1650

Pharmacology (F,W,S)

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This course begins with coverage of the general principles of pharmacology; the kinetics of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination; mechanisms of drug actions; receptor theory and dose response relationships. The remainder of the course includes coverage of the pharmacologic actions and clinical uses of the major classes of drugs acting on the autonomic, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, immune and central nervous systems. Other topics that are covered include the chemotherapy of microbial, parasitic diseases and neoplastic diseases, drugs acting on blood and blood-forming organs, hormones and hormone antagonists, principles of toxicology, vitamins, and drugs causing birth defects. Throughout the instructional program emphasis is placed on problem solving, formulating hypotheses, making therapeutic decisions, and the application of principles of osteopathic philosophy and evidence-based medicine. This course is taught during the Fall, Winter and Spring quarters with a single grade given at the completion of the course.

Credits: 10

CLIND  1701/1801

Directed Study OMSIII/OMSIV

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This course is a mandatory elective which affords students time for focused study to prepare to retake COMLEX—USA Level 1 or Level 2 CE. Students will meet with a Dean's Office representative and a COMCoach to establish a study plan. They will be expected to meet with their COMCoach on a weekly basis to reassess their progress and make necessary alterations to their study approach.

Credits: 2

CLIND 1702

Clinical Skills Assessment/EPA 1 (F)

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Clinical Skills (EPA) Assessment (CSA/EPA) 1 is a course which encompasses COMLEX-USA Level 2-Performance Evaluation style, Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), documentation skills and oral presentation skills. It is designed for 3rd year medical students. Each OSCE will be comprised of eight 14-minute patient encounters, a corresponding 9-minute SOAP writing exercise, followed by verbal feedback sessions with two of the standardized patients. Additionally, students will be asked to verbally present 2 of the patients to a clinician evaluator. Students may not take the COMLEX-USA Level 2-Performance Evaluation until the successful completion of the fall OSCE portion of this course.

Credits: 1

CLIND 1703

Clinical Skills Assessment/EPA II (S)

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Clinical Skills (EPA) Assessment II continues to assess students as they progress to attaining proficiency in the 13 core Entrustable Professional Activities. This course concentrates on the student’s ability to perform basic procedural skills. Students will insert IVs, Foley catheters, NG tubes as well as perform bag-valve mask ventilation and basic suturing using skills models under direct observation. The primary purposes of this program are to reinforce the integrated care of the patient, assess students’ progress towards achieving entrustability in core professional activities, and objectively assess student’s ability to perform basic procedural skills. Clinical Skills (EPA) Assessment II is a one credit hour course.

Credits: 1

CLROD 1701

Selective Rotation

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A four week clinical selective is offered during the OMS 3 year. Students are given the opportunity to select from a set of available rotations covering topics not typically offered in the Core OMS 3 curriculum. Such specialties may include: Transplant Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Radiology, Neurology, Clinical Research and others. (Prerequisites may apply to these selections).

Credits: 6

FMEDD 1702

Family Medicine Rotation

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Medical students complete an 8-week rotation during their OMSIII year. Carefully supervised, this experience provides students with the opportunity to practice non–hospital-based outpatient medicine as well as inpatient medicine. The goal of the program is to ensure that the student physician is exposed to the more common disorders encountered in an ambulatory care setting. Students are required to be able, under the supervision of a member of the department, to utilize and apply osteopathic concepts in taking a history and physical, perform appropriate procedures, develop a differential diagnosis, formulate a treatment regimen, and identify a health promotion program that includes techniques to bring about changes in the patient's lifestyle.

Credits: 12

IMEDD 1702-1802A & 1802B

Internal Medicine Rotation I-II

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In these rotations, medical students participate in daily teaching rounds and attend all teaching lectures and conferences. They also conduct in-depth studies on assigned cases. Medical students are evaluated, in part, on their ability to collect and analyze data and solve problems. A symptom-based lecture series is also offered weekly. On-line teaching material is offered such as clinical cases, instructional physical examination videos as well as lectures from the internal medicine course.

Credits: IMEDD 1702 - 12 credits; IMEDD 1802A - 6 credits; IMEDD 1802B - 6

OBGYD 1702

Obstetrics and Gynecology Rotation

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This rotation consists of a six-week block in the third year and is designed to provide students with a wide variety of clinical experiences. The rotation is accomplished in a wide variety of settings to include: 1) inpatient obstetrics, during which students participate in the labor, delivery, and postpartum care of patients; 2) inpatient gynecology, during which students observe and participate in surgery and pre- and postoperative care as well as daily inpatient rounds on obstetric and gynecologic patients; 3) outpatient clinics in obstetrics and gynecology, which provide an excellent setting in which students can observe and learn techniques and procedures pertinent to office practice; 4) ample one-on-one supervision by residents and attending physicians enhances each student's learning process; 5) formal lecture series covering all major topics in the specialty; and 6) Blackboard® distance learning case studies and quizzes provide consistent training and testing of students through the six week rotation regardless of site selected. A hands-on OMM skills lab is provided during the educational didactic sessions to demonstrate the integration of OPP/OMM into women's health care by students and residents together. The rotation begins with a general orientation session with simulation and hands-on skills in surgical scrub, suturing and knot tying, and the laparoscopic simulator along with gynecologic examinations, and labor and delivery management using the Noelle simulation model. A pre-test assesses the student's pre-rotation fundamental knowledge and is integral to the student's development and final exam assessment. This clerkship provides basic exposure and fundamental knowledge imperative to the primary care of the female patient.

Credits: 9

PEDID 1702

Pediatrics Rotation

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This six-week rotation is intended to provide the medical student with a comprehensive exposure to a wide variety of pediatric problems under the guidance and facilitation of the pediatric faculty. The curriculum is based on the core objectives of the Council of Medical Student Education in Pediatrics. The rotation includes clinical experience with faculty, online interactive case-based learning, didactic sessions, and simulation experiences. Attendance at all clinical and educational opportunities is mandatory.

Credits: 9

PSYCD 1702

Psychiatry Clerkship

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Working on hospital wards and outpatient clinics, the student experiences direct patient contact under the supervision of attending psychiatrists. This experience integrates previous learning with the clinical experiences. A series of didactics including lectures and demonstrations facilitate this process.

Credits: 6

SURGD 1702, 1802

Surgery Rotation I and II

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The core clerkships in surgery are intended to expose students to a broad scope of surgical disease, allow them to develop the critical skills necessary to manage surgical patients, and to broaden their technical expertise with procedural tasks. General surgery remains the cornerstone of the core clerkship. It is supplemented by surgical subspecialty experiences. Subspecialty choices include: orthopedics, ENT, ophthalmology, nerosurgery, anesthesiology, trauma surgery, burn surgery, plastics and reconstructive surgery, cardiovascular and vascular surgery, and urological surgery. All core clerkships are at CCOM affiliated hospitals and clinical sites. Clerkships are designed around both ambulatory and in-patient settings. Students are expected to scrub and participate in operative procedures as well as in pre-operative and post-operative management. Additionally, students should become proficient in history and physical taking, sterile technique, insertion of foley catheters, suturing, IV access, evaluation of wounds, application of dressings, bandages and splints, and removal of sutures and staples. Throughout the core eight weeks during the third year, students attend a weekly didactic lecture and procedure lab series intended to supplement the clinical experience. Students are also expected to participate in conferences offered by the hospital such as morbidity and mortality, tumor conference, and grand rounds.

Credits: SURGD 1702 - 12 credits; SURGD 1802 - 6

CLIND 1804

Clinical Skills Assessment/EPA III (S)

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Clinical Skills (EPA) Assessment III is an OMSIV course which is a review and assessment of a variety of 13 Entrustable Professional Activities (EPA) needed for a graduating osteopathic medical student. Review will take place through online modules, textbooks and practice sessions. Testing will take place in the MWU Simulation Center and the Science Hall Testing Center. The primary purposes of this program are to reinforce the integrated care of the patient, assess student performance of selected EPAs, and identify gaps in education. Clinical Performance Assessment III will focus on interpretation of laboratory imaging and cardiac testing, team practices and collaboration.

Credits: 1

CLROD 1800

Elective Clinical Clerkship

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Students have 32 total weeks of electives available, 4 weeks in the third year and 28 weeks in the fourth year. Elective rotations must be done in four week blocks, although students may petition the respective clinical department chair to be allowed to split an elective into two 2-week blocks. Students may request to do one 4-week elective in basic science or clinical research. One 4-week elective may be used for an international rotation and two 4-week elective opportunities may be used for vacation. A student must complete 6 electives (24 weeks) to meet graduation requirements.

Credits: 36

EMEDD 1805

Emergency Medicine Rotation

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In the emergency departments of CCOM's affiliate hospitals, medical students, under the direction of a member of the department, assist in providing emergency care. Medical students make initial assessments, take histories and do physicals, and make case presentations to the attending physician on a patient's condition. They must also propose a diagnosis, develop an appropriate treatment plan, and determine the final disposition of the patient. An orientation lecture and weekly didactic lectures/simulation labs are part of the rotation.

Credits: 6

FMEDD 1802

Family Medicine

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This four-week experience enables medical students to continue the process of developing skills in an ambulatory care setting. Fourth year medical students will be exposed to a patient population with more complex pathologies. The requirement of heightened diagnostic skills, as well as increased ability to deal with more serious and complex medical issues result in further development of the student’s skills in history taking and physical diagnosis as well as the development of more complex differential diagnoses and treatment plans. Students will rotate at core sites within the Chicago area, community medicine experience, or rural rotation. Community medicine selections include: care of the homeless, family planning, adolescent medicine or ambulatory geriatric care. Rural preceptorships are intended to foster interest in practicing in a rural area where resources and specialty services may be less readily available than in an urban center. Students in rural preceptorships will rotate within a practice located in Southern Illinois, Northern Indiana or Wisconsin.

Credits: 6

OMEDD 1801

Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine Rotation

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This is a core rotation required of all fourth year students. Each student will spend four weeks in the office of an osteopathic physician who uses an extensive amount of OMT in his or her practice. The didactic component will consist of a one-day comprehensive review of osteopathic principles, diagnosis, and common manipulative techniques held on the first day of the rotation in the OMM skills lab on the Downers Grove campus. At the conclusion of the rotation, a written examination and practical examination will be given. The student will gain practical experience in using osteopathic principles and practices in the clinical setting.

Credits: 6

Prerequisites

Satisfactory completion of OMEDD 1550, 1551, 1650 and 1651