Justin M. Schmidt, Pharm.D., BCPS, BC-ADM

Associate Professor



Midwestern University
Chicago College of Pharmacy
Department of Pharmacy Practice
Centennial Hall E-202
555 31st St.
Downers Grove, IL 60515

Office: (630) 515-6262
e-mail: jschmi@midwestern.edu


 

EDUCATION

PharmD Pharmacy Midwestern University
B.S. Biomedical Science Marquette University

RESEARCH SUMMARY

Research Interests

Glycemic control in the hospital setting is a topic that incites a spectrum of opinion and passion. While quality research have emerged that challenge assumptions of the past in the ambulatory and intensive care settings, the non-intensive hospital setting largely remains uncharted territory. Many parameters have been suggested as ideal therapeutic endpoints, and some targets of glycemic control have been suggested, but these are largely expert opinion.  I am interested in strengthening causal relationships between glycemic control (and means of attaining control) with clinical outcomes.

Research Projects

Insulin Titration and Outcomes in the Non-ICU Hospital Setting: This study aims to evaluate the effects of aggressive insulin titration on achievement of goals and improve outcomes associated with dysglycemia. This will be a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted to a general medicine unit in any VA hospital over a one year period. Aggressive insulin titration will be compared with conservative.  The primary outcome of the study will be 30-day mortality. Secondary outcomes will include clinical outcomes (e.g. infection, cardiovascular events), hospital disposition (e.g. length of hospital stay, ICU admission, 30-day readmission), and glycemic control (e.g. patient day weighted mean blood glucose, hypoglycemia).  Multivariate logistic regression analysis is planned to adjust the primary outcome for confounding. Data are planned to be collected, stored and analyzed with assistance from the VA Informatics and Computing Infrastructure (VINCI). 

Glycemic Variability in the Non-ICU Hospital Setting: The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of glycemic variability on clinical outcomes in patients with hyperglycemia. This study is a retrospective cohort that is examining non-intensive hospitalized patients over a five year period. Standard deviation is being used to assess variability of glucose during the first three days of admission. The quartiles with the greatest and least variability are being compared to assess impact on outcomes beyond three days. The primary outcome is hospital length of stay. The secondary outcomes include infection, ICU admission, ICU length of stay, and 30-day readmission rate. Logistic regression analysis is planned to control for baseline differences between the groups. Data have been collected by manual chart review thus far.

Fasting Glycemic Control in the Non-ICU Hospital Setting:  The goal of this study is to assess the effect of fasting glycemic control in hospitalized, non-ICU patients.  This study also is a retrospective cohort that is examining non-intensive hospitalized patients over a five year period. Patients with a fasting glucose <140 mg/dL are being compared to those with a fasting glucose >140 during their first three days of hospitalization. Outcomes evaluated included infection rate at least 48 hours after admission, length of hospital stay beyond the first 3 days, and ICU admission from the general medicine unit. Logistic regression analysis is being used to control for baseline differences between the groups. Data have been collected by manual chart review thus far.

Selected Publications