Clemence Chako headshot

Faculty Spotlight: Dr. Clemence Chako, B.V.Sc., Ph.D., M.P.H., DACVIM

Clinical Assistant Professor, Large Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine

  • AZ - Glendale
"I would like my students to understand the bigger picture and practice critical thinking. I would like them to have a global view of things before narrowing it down."
Clemence Chako, B.V.Sc., Ph.D., M.P.H., DACVIM

Years at Midwestern University: December 2014 to present

Research Interests: Ruminant gastrointestinal diseases and immunology

What is the most rewarding part of being a member of the Midwestern University faculty? 

I enjoy working for an organization that cares about educating students as well as the faculty and staff’s well-being. I enjoy coming to work because there is a culture of kindness that is nurtured by everyone, including the University and college administrators. Everyone feels and acts like they belong, because they do.

How do you engage students in the learning process? 

I remind veterinary students that they are veterinarians in training, so they should think of themselves and act as veterinarians. That also means taking responsibility for making clinical decisions, as well as practicing medical procedures under supervision. As their supervisor on clinical rotations, I must give them freedom to practice while being patient and present so that I can give them advice and feedback, while not compromising the welfare of our patients.

What do you hope students learn from your classes? 

I would like my students to understand the bigger picture and practice critical thinking. I would like them to have a global view of things before narrowing it down. They must always ask themselves, “Why?” Why do certain diseases present in a certain way, why do patients develop particular clinical signs, why do we choose certain treatment options, and so forth.

What lessons would you like students to take with them in their professional careers? 

It’s important to be good at practicing veterinary medicine, but it’s even more important to be kind. Treat people with kindness and help make the world a better place.

What about your profession should people know more about? 

It is humbling to be trusted by the owners to provide veterinary care to their animals, and we do not take it for granted. I would ask people to be kind to their veterinarians, even when at times we get unfavorable outcomes despite our best efforts.

Anything to add? 

“When given the choice between being right or being kind, choose kind.” - Dr. Wayne W. Dyer

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